Shout out to all of our incredible sponsors!

Shout out to all of our incredible sponsors!

Here at The Collective Experience we are proud to offer race fans the chance to get closer to their favorite riders with unparalleled behind the scenes experiences along with supporting the privateers and satellite teams of our sport. We have had the pleasure of meeting fans from all over the world and connecting with more riders than we can keep up with.  It's been a huge blessing and something that we are dedicated to growing and seeing through 10 fold. We put in more effort than you can imagine, however none of what we have accomplished to date would be possible without the support, kindness, and all around positive energy from our incredible sponsors.  These companies have gone above and beyond for us and we wanted to make sure that you knew about all of these incredible industry businesses to get yourself hooked up with the best there is.... 

 

 FXR is one of the most popular gear brands on the market.  They are a dedicated and passionate gear company that is known for their support of Motocross and Supercross champions and weekend warriors a like.  Just take a look at any professional race and you'll see dozens of privateer and support riders wearing FXR on the gate.  Not only do they provide amazing support, but they also have some of the highest quality and best fitting gear around.  Just ask riders like AJ Catanzaro, Henry Miller, and racing legend Mike Brown.  If you want to support a brand that supports all levels of racers like no body else, then head over to   FXRRacing.com   and grab yourself a set of brand new kick ass gear today! Make sure you use promo code 'TCEFXR3012" to save big time at check out!

FXR is one of the most popular gear brands on the market.  They are a dedicated and passionate gear company that is known for their support of Motocross and Supercross champions and weekend warriors a like.  Just take a look at any professional race and you'll see dozens of privateer and support riders wearing FXR on the gate.  Not only do they provide amazing support, but they also have some of the highest quality and best fitting gear around.  Just ask riders like AJ Catanzaro, Henry Miller, and racing legend Mike Brown.  If you want to support a brand that supports all levels of racers like no body else, then head over to FXRRacing.com and grab yourself a set of brand new kick ass gear today! Make sure you use promo code 'TCEFXR3012" to save big time at check out!

 Evans Waterless Coolant makes racing fluids that meet the intensely high demand of professional racing.  They have countless wins in all forms of motorsports and continue to support racers at all levels.  Walk through the pits of a Motocross or Supercross race and you're bound to see Evans coolant bottles on a majority of tool boxes.  Make sure you check these guys out at   Evanscoolant.com   and get your machine performing at it's best! Use promo code 'TCE25" to save at checkout.  Get Evans Coolant and get ahead of the competition! 

Evans Waterless Coolant makes racing fluids that meet the intensely high demand of professional racing.  They have countless wins in all forms of motorsports and continue to support racers at all levels.  Walk through the pits of a Motocross or Supercross race and you're bound to see Evans coolant bottles on a majority of tool boxes.  Make sure you check these guys out at Evanscoolant.com and get your machine performing at it's best! Use promo code 'TCE25" to save at checkout.  Get Evans Coolant and get ahead of the competition! 

 Rutted Racing Co. is a Minnesota based apparel brand with an enormous passion for racing and they bring that passion into each one of their products.  They continue to support Pro riders like Henry Miller and Tyler Bowers all the way down to the local 50cc beginner riders.  If you love racing and want to support a grass roots company with a dedication to it's customers and the sport then check out    Rutted Racing   and show off your racing spirit!

Rutted Racing Co. is a Minnesota based apparel brand with an enormous passion for racing and they bring that passion into each one of their products.  They continue to support Pro riders like Henry Miller and Tyler Bowers all the way down to the local 50cc beginner riders.  If you love racing and want to support a grass roots company with a dedication to it's customers and the sport then check out  Rutted Racing and show off your racing spirit!

 Ever wonder who makes those incredible edits of your favorite pro riders? How about who the geniuses are behind those theatric music videos we all love? Well, look no further.  Surge Unlimited is a media company that provides it's customers with amazing one of a kind video edits to promote themselves or their business.  Surge Unlimited has years of experience and has worked with fortune 500 companies all the way to professional Supercross and Motocross trainers and riders like Aldon Baker and Marvin Musquin.  There's pretty much nothing that Surge Unlimited can't do.  Want a custom made promotional video for your business or a private edit to showcase your riding skills, then head to   Surgeunlimited.com   and get hooked up like a pro!

Ever wonder who makes those incredible edits of your favorite pro riders? How about who the geniuses are behind those theatric music videos we all love? Well, look no further.  Surge Unlimited is a media company that provides it's customers with amazing one of a kind video edits to promote themselves or their business.  Surge Unlimited has years of experience and has worked with fortune 500 companies all the way to professional Supercross and Motocross trainers and riders like Aldon Baker and Marvin Musquin.  There's pretty much nothing that Surge Unlimited can't do.  Want a custom made promotional video for your business or a private edit to showcase your riding skills, then head to Surgeunlimited.com and get hooked up like a pro!

 There's no team like the RAK Racing team!  RAK stands for Random Acts of Kindness and that is exactly what they are all about.  RAK racing specializes in doing incredibly nice and heart warming things with the their racing budget and by generous donations from supporters.  Not to mention, the crew over RAK Racing kick some serious ass on the race track. From buying dinner for unsuspecting groups of people to paying for tolls or house necessities for under privilegded, RAK strives to make a difference.  They are also in attendance at majority of the Pro Supercross rounds providing mental coaching and more.  Reach out to Jason and the crew at   RAK-Racing.com   and pop in a donation to help make this world a kinder place and support some badass racers at the same time.

There's no team like the RAK Racing team!  RAK stands for Random Acts of Kindness and that is exactly what they are all about.  RAK racing specializes in doing incredibly nice and heart warming things with the their racing budget and by generous donations from supporters.  Not to mention, the crew over RAK Racing kick some serious ass on the race track. From buying dinner for unsuspecting groups of people to paying for tolls or house necessities for under privilegded, RAK strives to make a difference.  They are also in attendance at majority of the Pro Supercross rounds providing mental coaching and more.  Reach out to Jason and the crew at RAK-Racing.com and pop in a donation to help make this world a kinder place and support some badass racers at the same time.

 Were gonna keep this simple.  Do you live in the Northeast? Do you ride dirt bikes? Then enough said.  It's a no-brainer.  You need to check our   Northeastdirtbike.com    Not only are they a full service race shop with tons of professional hop up experiences, but they also post regular calendar updates to keep you in the know with all of the racing going on in the Northeast. Jeremiah over at NE dirt bikes will make sure your ride is up to par with any Pro Supercross race machine.  Save yourself some time and money and drop off your bike to these guys. You won't be sorry.

Were gonna keep this simple.  Do you live in the Northeast? Do you ride dirt bikes? Then enough said.  It's a no-brainer.  You need to check our Northeastdirtbike.com  Not only are they a full service race shop with tons of professional hop up experiences, but they also post regular calendar updates to keep you in the know with all of the racing going on in the Northeast. Jeremiah over at NE dirt bikes will make sure your ride is up to par with any Pro Supercross race machine.  Save yourself some time and money and drop off your bike to these guys. You won't be sorry.

 Join the world's biggest online community dedicated to Motocross and Supercross.  MotoHub is unique in that they are a meeting place and social playground for all things racing from pro racing to amateur weekend races.  Have a new Moto related business or new track that you want to promote? Then   TheMotoHub.com   is the place for you.  Did we also mention that they host regular Q&A session with pro riders and industry insiders? Yea, its pretty awesome! You can even win contest, giveaways, and prizes.  What's not to love? Sign up today and be a part of the coolest thing in racing!

Join the world's biggest online community dedicated to Motocross and Supercross.  MotoHub is unique in that they are a meeting place and social playground for all things racing from pro racing to amateur weekend races.  Have a new Moto related business or new track that you want to promote? Then TheMotoHub.com is the place for you.  Did we also mention that they host regular Q&A session with pro riders and industry insiders? Yea, its pretty awesome! You can even win contest, giveaways, and prizes.  What's not to love? Sign up today and be a part of the coolest thing in racing!

 If you ain't grippin you're slippin! That's the motto over at MotoTape.  Their name sake is exactly what they are all about.  Providing the racing world with products to make sure that they can hold onto their machines.  From Cobra minis to full factory Yamaha's these guys have you covered.  We personally rock MotoTape on our bikes and can attest to their durability.  Check these guys out at   MotoTape.com   and make sure you you ain't slippin. 

If you ain't grippin you're slippin! That's the motto over at MotoTape.  Their name sake is exactly what they are all about.  Providing the racing world with products to make sure that they can hold onto their machines.  From Cobra minis to full factory Yamaha's these guys have you covered.  We personally rock MotoTape on our bikes and can attest to their durability.  Check these guys out at MotoTape.com and make sure you you ain't slippin. 

 What's one of the most important parts of your bike? Yes, the grips are important, but we were thinking more along the lines of suspension. Yeah, that stuff.  Personalized suspension set-ups are one of the biggest performance adders that you can get for your bike.  If your bike aint' handling right, then your gonna have a bad time.    SGB   has you covered!  They specialize in providing top level support and parts to professionals Supercross riders and amateurs a like.  Make sure you reach out to this crew to get your bike setup like a champ!  Mention The Collective Experience to save big all while getting the best service.

What's one of the most important parts of your bike? Yes, the grips are important, but we were thinking more along the lines of suspension. Yeah, that stuff.  Personalized suspension set-ups are one of the biggest performance adders that you can get for your bike.  If your bike aint' handling right, then your gonna have a bad time.  SGB has you covered!  They specialize in providing top level support and parts to professionals Supercross riders and amateurs a like.  Make sure you reach out to this crew to get your bike setup like a champ!  Mention The Collective Experience to save big all while getting the best service.

 Patched is the only place to go for custom made butt patches.  If you can dream it, they can do it.  Patched MX is a small business with a huge vision and passion for us riders.  That means that they are dedicated to proving you with top notch customer service and guarantee satisfaction with their work.  How good are these guys? Well, for starters they have put patches on Adam Cianciarulo, AJ Catanzaro, and Adam Enticknap to name a few.  Want to customize your kit and put your personal flair into your set-up? Then check out these guys at   PatchedMX.com   and get your imagination brought to life!

Patched is the only place to go for custom made butt patches.  If you can dream it, they can do it.  Patched MX is a small business with a huge vision and passion for us riders.  That means that they are dedicated to proving you with top notch customer service and guarantee satisfaction with their work.  How good are these guys? Well, for starters they have put patches on Adam Cianciarulo, AJ Catanzaro, and Adam Enticknap to name a few.  Want to customize your kit and put your personal flair into your set-up? Then check out these guys at PatchedMX.com and get your imagination brought to life!

 There are quite a few Moto related podcasts out there, but none are quite as in-depth and all around more informative than   BigMXRadio.com  !  From weekly race reviews and re-caps to interviews with some of the most popular people in the industry this podcast has it all.  How good are they? Well top brands like FMF and Alpinestars put their support into these guys and so should you.  Give them a follow on Facebook and Instagram to check out their incredible posts and other content.  Not to mention we personally listen to them each week and regularly call-in.  Not to toot our own horn, but it's a pretty stellar segment :) Make sure you tune in each week to stay in the know and get some good laughs from Brad G (aka Everyone's favorite Canadian).

There are quite a few Moto related podcasts out there, but none are quite as in-depth and all around more informative than BigMXRadio.com!  From weekly race reviews and re-caps to interviews with some of the most popular people in the industry this podcast has it all.  How good are they? Well top brands like FMF and Alpinestars put their support into these guys and so should you.  Give them a follow on Facebook and Instagram to check out their incredible posts and other content.  Not to mention we personally listen to them each week and regularly call-in.  Not to toot our own horn, but it's a pretty stellar segment :) Make sure you tune in each week to stay in the know and get some good laughs from Brad G (aka Everyone's favorite Canadian).

TCE Check in with SX trainer Taylor Selby

TCE Check in with SX trainer Taylor Selby

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In our sport we love seeing riders make progress and improve on their skill set every season.  It's really eye opening and inspiring to see these athletes rise above the trials and tribulations associated with professional racing.  From lower budget privateers to top level factory riders, when your favorite rider makes strides and reaches a new level in the sport its very exciting.  Over the past few seasons we have had the pleasure of seeing two of our top riders, Adam and Tyler Enticknap, make some serious improvements to their programs and finishes.  Both riders have landed themselves into numerous main event races and have steadily increased their speed and efficiency on their bikes.  We were curious about their progression and how they made their improvements and learned of their involvement with trainer Taylor Selby.  Taylor has played a huge role in their programs acting as both trainer and race day support.  We wanted to find out more about Taylor, his role, and the progression of riders in the sport so we tracked him down to pick his brain a bit...

Hey Taylor!  Tell us little bit about yourself and what you do in the sport.

I'm originally from Wisconsin, 29 years old, I was a NCAA all american linebacker and NFL free agent.  I have a Bachelors of Science degree in Physiology and I've been training for 10 years now and working out since 6th grade.  I've played every sport growing up and also racing.  I work with athletes of all ages and levels from physical therapy to specific sport performance.

How did you get involved in training and fitness? What motivated you?

Racing and sports have been a passion of mine since I was a child. My grandpa introduced me to stock car and late model racing at a young age and my uncle introduced me to power sports later on. Growing up in the midwest all we had to do was hunt and ride river beds, tracks, and woods everything on from dirt bikes to snowmobiles.  I grew up without parents and fitness/sports have always been my escape and my go to comfort. Competition has led me to my current life where I strive to compete in anything that I do like Motocross, road-biking, MTB, and business. I raced and rode dirt bikes at a real young age and then football took over as I grew and figured out I had a college future playing ball.  I came back to Motocross after 12 years of football.

 Tyler Enticknap has seen a huge improvement in his injury recovery and race craft thanks to Taylor and his support.  The benefits of a well approached plan and conditioning are invaluable to a top level racer.  P/C  @szumski_photography

Tyler Enticknap has seen a huge improvement in his injury recovery and race craft thanks to Taylor and his support.  The benefits of a well approached plan and conditioning are invaluable to a top level racer.  P/C @szumski_photography

How did you get involved with training Adam and Tyler Enticknap?

"HAHA", I always remember these moments.  It started when I bought a bike and started riding again.  l live 30 min from Zaca Station and I ran into them a lot (always broken and limping around). I decided to approach them and Ty had recently just undergone ACL reconstruction. He came in and I did his full therapy and got him back on a bike in a shorter time frame than doctors gave him.  Addy always "cool guyed" me and basically never worked out through his career.  After seeing Ty's progress he decided to give it a go.  Going on 4 years now we have accomplished massive leaps in their fitness and career along with mindset and lifestyle changes as most have come to see.

How do you approach training these two vs. other athletes?

Addy and Ty are confused as twins.  They couldn't be more different other than looks. Ty is a very aggressive no questions or no complaints.  Ty is a "head down" type of  worker.  Addy is all finesse and thought.  I always say if they made up one racer we would be on the podium already. All in all, we've had to teach the steps of the meaning of being a "pro athlete" basically changing all lifestyle first and then working through a real off-season/ on-season program.  Its taken some time, but 2017 was a massive leap for both of them as they started adapting to their individual changes and needs. I hold all my athletes to a very high level of standards and if we fall back we pick it up harder and get up back up.  It's not just grunt work and grit behind training.  It's more psychological and planning/programming than what people see.  Everything from oxygen thresholds to heart rate applications to food intake at what times of the day based on volume of work load.  Like I said, they are completely different in every way other than the fact that they have the deepest passion for racing and helping people.

What type of energy do they bring to the training program?

They bring it everyday, no questions asked.  If I lay it out they take care of it.  They always have high energy and sometimes too high and need to bring it down to more focal points.  When they walk into our facility everybody loves them and they love everyone else.  For as gritty and dirty as these two get they are the most kind and loving/caring guys and open to help anyone around them.  They never ask a question "why" or look for a return. That's why I will always work with them.  

 Taylor and the boys review race strategy and daily approach between practices at The Monster Energy Cup in Las Vegas.  Taylor plays a crucial role in their program and continues to help these two riders reach their full potential.

Taylor and the boys review race strategy and daily approach between practices at The Monster Energy Cup in Las Vegas.  Taylor plays a crucial role in their program and continues to help these two riders reach their full potential.

What are the training sessions like?

Depending on where we are in the season, typically they come in warm up for 10 with a moderate heart rate interval build then go through individualized Strength Happens mobility activation work based upon their ailments.  We then break into 3 circuits in our Strength Happens programming.  It all depends on where we are at in season because its specifically based on heart rate and the duration of volume stress on the nervous system to get as close to Motocross/Supercross replication as we can. We have a very solid strength aspect with mobility being key and then move into specifics and cool down post workout.

Adam had a pretty successful year and did great in the first few races.  What was it like seeing his progress each week?

We have our ups and downs and that's racing.  We love progress of course, but so many variables go into racing.  We have worked on consistency more than anything in all aspects from eating to starts to motor mounts and dialing in what works all around.  There's no better feeling than progress, but we take it in stride and always set up for what's next and never settle for being content or stagnant.  That's why these two are special.  They always want that next step. We've broke a lot of bones over the years and significant injuries and the first conversation they give me is "whats our plan and when can you get us back on the bike".  It's unreal and humbling.  

We’ve seen an influx of SX and MX specific trainers pop up in recent years. What do you think has caused this boom in the MX training sector?

There is a lot of pretend out there without proper knowledge or experience even on a bike to know what goes into this.  At this level you have to understand how the bodies central nervous system works with each one of your athletes.  Thus, why broad Crossfit "bullshit" programs don't apply to everyone and broad cycling programs don't apply to everyone.  At this level of racing and demand each body is broken down specifically to that persons needs wether it be nutrition intake or mechanical, the smallest variable can make the world of difference.  Theres a lot of spotlight and media and like every other sport people want to be apart of it.  I find the passion because it's been a part of my life forever and the demand on the body is greater than any sport I've been apart of.  Mind you I've played Football at the highest level and have had nationally renowned trainers.  I've ran track, I've wrestled, and I've boxed for years along with playing Lacrosse. 

 The training and work never stops for Adam and Tyler.  Progression takes persistence and they always make sure that they are focused on their goals.  Top finishes in 2019 and beyond is their highest prioritiy.

The training and work never stops for Adam and Tyler.  Progression takes persistence and they always make sure that they are focused on their goals.  Top finishes in 2019 and beyond is their highest prioritiy.

What about the uniqueness of SX and MX makes high level endurance training such a necessity?

You have to operate at such a high level without a mistake for longer periods of time more so than any other sport.  You have to be able to take risks and be comfortable in high risk environments.  It's a lot of psychological confidence in being able to operate in that space for 20 minutes plus,  while also being able to change at any moment and not to mention the physical demand of a 170-200 BPM heart rate and holding that pace.  When you look at it on paper it looks impossible and that's why each night the best 40 in the world get to attempt making their mark.  You have to prepare non-stop. Unlike any other sport where you can just show up based upon your physical and gifts you now have a bike and all the other variables within the race like track break down or other riders etc... There is never a place where you can settle because this sport is never ending with improvements being 100th's of a second.

Where do you see training in SX and MX going?

I only see it continuing to rise.  It's a small market being their are only so many athletes at this elite level, but you're seeing the Champions crowned that are known for their off-season and on-season work both on and off the bike.  It speaks for itself.  The guys just riding continue to fall through the ranks and end up racing just to barely even make a night show.  Without knowing someone I can watch and see who is trying to progress and who is just trying to stay afloat.

What do you currently have going on?

Currently I'm in Santa Barbara and have been for years.  Being a partner with a unique private facility Strength Happens, growing that brand with Mike Claytor and our team.  We have a lot of amazing things in the works and Mike has been at this and making his program more well known for the better part of 12 years.  We're now in all aspects from Iron Man competitions to therapy to everyday strength needs for everyone.  We are focused on continuing to grow as I said and looking at a 2nd and 3rd facility.  This is our life and we strive to help everyone and I'm lucky to be apart of it 

 Adam Enticknap has had a huge improvement in his speed in early 2018.  Although some of his results did not show it, his speed and overall approach was greatly improved over the previous year and it's only a matter of time before Adam is an even bigger threat on his big Honda 450.

Adam Enticknap has had a huge improvement in his speed in early 2018.  Although some of his results did not show it, his speed and overall approach was greatly improved over the previous year and it's only a matter of time before Adam is an even bigger threat on his big Honda 450.

What are some of your goals for the future and where do you plan to take your career in training?

My goal will always remain in terms of helping as many people as I can while maintaining quality and specifics.  My door is always open and training and competing is my life.

For more information on Taylor and Strength Happens be sure to follow him at (Taylor Selby) and check out Strengthhappens.com.  Be sure to stay tuned into The Collective Experience for behind the scenes promos and exclusives with the best and brightest in the industry.

SGB Suspension and Patched MX have joined the TCE program for 2018

SGB Suspension and Patched MX have joined the TCE program for 2018

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We are excited to have SGB Suspension and Patchedmx.com as new sponsors of the TCE MX Fan Experience for 2018.  We loved the support from the industry and supporters like these help to keep us providing more and more for our riders and fans. 

SGB Suspension is a Motorcycle tuning shop in Maryland that specializes in engine work along with suspension tuning/customization with Race Tech products.  SGB has supported local racers at all levels and works with high end clientele such as Supercross privateer AJ Catanzaro.  Jason at SGB Suspension prides himself on detail and precise tuning to meet the demands of the serious Motocross/Supercross racer.  Need your suspension set up for your racing discipline and skill level? How about a deep cleaning and fresh fluids?  Want some ultra-trick coated forks like the pros? Then hit up SGB Suspension and get hooked up today. Mention The Collective Experience for a great discount with the same top notch quality!

 AJ Catanzaro trusts SGB Suspension on his race bikes.  These guys are always there to support the local racers and national Pros.  Imagine what they can do to your ride!

AJ Catanzaro trusts SGB Suspension on his race bikes.  These guys are always there to support the local racers and national Pros.  Imagine what they can do to your ride!

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Also new to the program is Patched MX. Patched is a custom butt patch company that specializes in very detailed and fully custom works of art to show off your uniqueness and attitude! No job is too big or too small.  From last names, to racing numbers, to full blown pictures, Patched can get you set up right.  Racers all over trust Patched MX to show off their personalities.  Pro riders such as Adam Cianciarulo, AJ Catanzaro,  and Adam Enticknap all have Patched MX work on their set up.  If you want to look #litkit status for your next ride then be sure to hit up Patched MX.  Mention The Collective Experience to receive a stellar discount and show off your style at all the local national races. 

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 Nothing says factory like a custom butt patch! Top Pros trust Patched MX to keep them looking ultra trick and custom. If you can imagine it, they can make it! Hit them up today!

Nothing says factory like a custom butt patch! Top Pros trust Patched MX to keep them looking ultra trick and custom. If you can imagine it, they can make it! Hit them up today!

TCE Dream Chasers with Jake Vanada

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This month's Dream Chasers segment features one of the most likable and helpful guys in the sport.  Jake Vanada spends his weekends being the supporter and positive voice for many within the industry.  As a chaplain, Jake is responsible for spreading knowledge, encouragement, and faith amongst the riders and industry personnel. Jake is an invaluable member of the SX family so we wanted to sit down with him and get his 2 cents on the industry and what his role is all about....

Hey Jake! For the few people out there who may not be familiar with you tell us a bit of who you are and what you do at the races?

I am the race chaplain for the Supercross and Motocross series.  I travel with the race series and work along side the promoters and the AMA.  I speak at chapel.  I meet with riders, team owners, managers, trainers etc. throughout the race day.  I am down at the starts to encourage the guys and pray for them.  I lead team meetings and team prayers with teams that want them.

 How did you get started on your path as a Chaplin? 

I got started in ministry back in 1994, so I have pretty much been doing ministry my whole life.  In 2012, I had the opportunity to get the chaplain ministry started with the National Snocross Race series through a good friend Jesse Strege.  I am a big time believer in paying attention to God calling us to do what He wants.  At the time, I was on staff with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, so I was working in the world of sports in the western suburbs of Minneapolis.  God opened a door, all I did was walk through it.

 Jake spends his time helping and working with as many riders and industry personnel as possible.   From the sport's most elite to the everyday privateer, Jake wants to help everyone.

Jake spends his time helping and working with as many riders and industry personnel as possible.   From the sport's most elite to the everyday privateer, Jake wants to help everyone.

How did you get into the sport and what lead you to stepping up to the role that you have in the industry? 

In 2008, I spoke at a FCA MX camp in Indiana.  I met some awesome people who loved God and loved dirt bikes.  I have always loved God, and this dirt bike thing was new to me, but I have always loved horsepower and powersports…so it was an intstant connection.  Through that camp, we started a FCA MX camp in Minnesota in 2009.  Because of that connection, I met Steve Hudson who was the chaplain for our sport for 20 years.

It seems like you’re one of the busiest guys in the sport. Take us through your day at the races? 

Haha…there are a ton of uber busy guys who work like crazy to be the best.  Being around this industry has turbo charged my desire to be the best.  Race day is a busy day for sure.  I get to the track a couple of hours before track walk.  Most of the supercross rounds, I start off the day doing a short talk for the KTM Jr. SC riders…which is a total blast…seeing those young faces and all their parents…all jacked up to ride on a “REAL” Supercross track.  It is pretty dang cool.  Right after I am done with that, we are off to track walk where I  make a point to check in with certain guys or follow up with certain riders or managers.  After the race director is done with the riders meeting, we have a short chapel service, its optional which allows those who can’t stay or prefer not to stay a chance to get back to the pits and get ready for the race day.  I speak and teach for 12-15 mins., pray for the day and then we are off and running wide open for race day.  The rest of the day is all about relationships, mentoring, counseling, encouraging, basically walking alongside everyone in the pro paddock area, from privateers and their families, to the factory rigs, riders, mechanics.  I am on the move all day.  I love what I do.

How does what you do help these riders out? 

I think for many of them, having someone there to connect with on a bigger level than just racing, someone who genuinely cares about who they are as a man or a woman, not just because of what they do, it means something to them.   I am for them.  I want what is best for them.  I get excited for them when they finally make the main, or finish in the top 10, or make it on the podium.  I hurt with them when they don’t get the result they wanted or expected.  That is the role of a chaplain.  Come alongside…help them with life, racing, relationships, faith.  The whole thing.

 A lot of what Jake does is bring positivity and perspective through scripture.  Many riders utilize his knowledge and teachings to improve their everyday lives.

A lot of what Jake does is bring positivity and perspective through scripture.  Many riders utilize his knowledge and teachings to improve their everyday lives.

What is it like working with and helping/supporting so many high profile riders?   

Its pretty cool, but I don’t look at them like a typical fan of the sport might…we are all a sort of “Moto family” on the weekends.  I look at them as my brothers and sisters doing life, working hard, trying to be great at this racing thing that we all get to do.

During the morning Chapel service you touch on a lot of great examples and insights.  How do you decide on each topic that you discuss at every round? 

That is a really great question.  I try and teach truth from God’s word in a practical, encouraging, and fun way.  What I talk about is often shaped by how the season is going or what I see our industry needs.  I pray a lot about this and seek the Lord on what to talk about.

One of the coolest things about your service is how relatable and relevant you make each session. How difficult is it to do this? 

Thank you…its cool you say that…I hear that a lot.  I’m not really sure why so many say that, except that God is the one who has given me the ability to do this…if it wasn’t for Him, pretty sure the messages would be rather boring.

 Jake and his family are no strangers to motorsports.  Hailing from Minnesota, Jake has his hands into the snowmobile scene in a big way.

Jake and his family are no strangers to motorsports.  Hailing from Minnesota, Jake has his hands into the snowmobile scene in a big way.

What is one major thing that you have taken away from working with riders in this sport? 

Each one of them has a gift and ability and a massive drive to be great at this sport.  Every single rider has a story…its incredible.  The number one thing I take away?  How hard each one works to be great.  It is mind-blowing and super motivating.

How has your faith helped you reach your goals and get you where you are today? 

For sure it has.  My faith has grown in tremendous ways and continues to every year.  For example, we raise the support we need for us to do this ministry.  God sends every dollar we need…it blows me away.  I trust Him completely…with it all…who I talk to, what to say.  I think when we all depend more on God through faith, than we do on ourselves…great things happen.  I see this in my life all the time.

If there is one thing that you would change within the industry what would it be?

  That’s a hard one.  There is so much good happening and so many people working hard to make our sport better, from the promoters, to production, to manufacturers…to see it all from the inside, its incredible.  I know one thing that would really help our sport is more support for our privateers, which they are working on, but the gap between the privateer pro and the factory pro is still pretty big.

 On race day a majority of the riders make sure to seek out Jake throughout the day.  With this sport being so mental and hectic, Jake's insight and support is often times a necessity. 

On race day a majority of the riders make sure to seek out Jake throughout the day.  With this sport being so mental and hectic, Jake's insight and support is often times a necessity. 

 Jake is usually one of the first people that riders shout out and acknowledge.  Here Jake and his wife spend time with the 2018 West Coast 250 SX Champion!

Jake is usually one of the first people that riders shout out and acknowledge.  Here Jake and his wife spend time with the 2018 West Coast 250 SX Champion!

What are some cool things that you have in the works or things that you are getting involved in?

  I am starting a whole new part of the chaplain ministry this summer, something other sports like the NBA and the NFL do for their athletes…helping riders who are done riding.  I am pretty stoked about it.  I have some plans as well for training camp next fall…building on some stuff we got started in the fall of ’17.  I am super stoked about it.

How do you hope to have an impact on the industry and people that you talk to? 

I hope it is a huge impact, but not at all because of me, but because of Christ in me.  I want to see people in our industry get on the right path…the narrow road that leads to life.  Helping them do that and loving them in the process is pretty much the whole reason I do what I do.  I love what I do.  I love our sport and the people in it, from the truck drivers, to the top factory riders and everyone in between. 

For more information on Jake and his endeavors be sure to give him a follow @jakevanada . Stay tuned for more behind the scenes and in depth stories and stay locked to The Collective Experience for all of our new and exciting offerings.

TCE Perspective with Ash Money

TCE Perspective with Ash Money

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We're continuing to bring you new and exciting perspectives in the sport that we all love.  Too often we are fed the same watered down rider interviews and even more often we are left longing for more in depth and unique perspectives.  Well, we're here to give you just that! This week we take a look into the life of Ashley "Ash-Money" Sandte, girlfriend of superstar Supercross racer Adam Enticknap.  Adam has one of the biggest followings and most loyal fan base as the races and Ash is always right by his side to meet supporters and help Adam in everyday possible.  Always a crowd favorite, we wanted to get some insight from Ash on the sport through her eyes and give you another behind the scenes look at what it takes to compete at this level for not only Adam, but Ash as well...

Hey Ash!  You're pretty popular around the pits, but for the select few who may not be as familiar tell us a bit about yourself and who you are.

Ash Money is in the house!! Also known as Ash, or Ashley. I am the beyond proud girlfriend of Adam Enticknap "The 7 Deuce Deuce" and dog mom to our adorable French bulldog, Drake. 

How did you meet Adam and get involved in the sport?

I met Adam through a mutual friend. At the time he was newly single and my friend really pushed for us to meet. We ended up having the chance to meet in a group setting, the next day he came to my flag football game where he asked for my phone number and the rest was history. Honestly, I think he was pretty impressed with my QB skills ;) I really only got involved in the sport once Adam and I started dating.

 Adam, Ash, and little Drake are quite the pack.  When Tyler, Adam's brother, comes around it's always a party! You won't find a more fun family to chill with at the races.

Adam, Ash, and little Drake are quite the pack.  When Tyler, Adam's brother, comes around it's always a party! You won't find a more fun family to chill with at the races.

Did you know about Motocross and Supercross prior to meeting him?

Pretty much before Adam I knew absolutely nothing about Motocross/Supercross. My friend had an extra ticket to Anaheim 1 and invited me to go. I had the best time and was soooo impressed with my first SX experience!! Who knew at the time that was a foreshadow of my near future?!

What were your initial thoughts about the sport?

The sport quickly gained my respect and I had no idea there was this whole other world of MX/SX out there. 

What surprised you the most about the life of a professional Motocross and Supercross rider?

It's more than a full time job! Days are packed with prepping the track in the morning and evening, watering the track multiple times a day, training, riding, and bike work all while traveling and racing on the weekends. 

 Ash is always a fan favorite at the races.  While Adam has his lines of fans, Ash has her huge following as well. Fans are always stopping by to hang with Ash and meet Adam's number one supporter.

Ash is always a fan favorite at the races.  While Adam has his lines of fans, Ash has her huge following as well. Fans are always stopping by to hang with Ash and meet Adam's number one supporter.

How has his involvement in the sport shaped your relationship?

His loyalty, dedication, never give up attitude, and respect for the sport and his sponsors has carried into his personal life and is the foundation our of relationship. 

Walk us through a day in the life of you two?

There are technically four of us because you've gotta make sure you include the whole crew: myself, Adam, Tyler and Drake. I work full time during the week, so those days are pretty uneventful for us. 

On days that we get to spend a full day together goes something like this:

 Every morning Adam wakes up and wishes our dog a very warm and loving "good morning" while he rubs his cheeks for like a minute straight! Adam then makes his way to the kitchen to turn on the espresso machine that he is madly obsessed with. Tyler takes his role as the morning chef while Adam transforms into a Barista and puts his heart and soul into making the perfect cup of espresso with latte art (work in progress.) We then head to the track where they do their thing. I do my best to get accurate lap times, snap some action shots and selfies while getting my tan on and playing with Drake. Then we head home for a second espresso drink, dinner and bike work, go to bed, wake up and repeat. 

How do you impact his career/training?

I just try to give him as much unconditional love and support as I can. He does an incredible job handling his own business and I help out with the small things where I can. 

 The Enticknaps make riding and training days a family affair.  Ash is a huge part of their success and always has their backs.  Nothing's better than having a tight knit team backing you up.

The Enticknaps make riding and training days a family affair.  Ash is a huge part of their success and always has their backs.  Nothing's better than having a tight knit team backing you up.

What is the most stressful/negative part about sharing your life with a pro rider?

The time away from each other. Luckily I'm a pretty independent person, but I can never seem to get enough of Adam and our time together. 

What is the most exciting/best part?

Being able to support and watch him live his dream every day. 

What is your favorite part about the sport?

The LIT KIT award. Just kidding....I truly love the community and getting to know and build relationships with all of the wonderful people involved in the sport. 

 Adam and Ash are the definition of handwork and dedication.  They both put a lot into the sport and enjoy every second of the process.  They make quite the team!

Adam and Ash are the definition of handwork and dedication.  They both put a lot into the sport and enjoy every second of the process.  They make quite the team!

What is one cool fact/thing about Adam that fans should know?

I feel like he shares a lot of his life and passions, but I'll give you two interesting facts you probably didn't know about The 7 Deuce Deuce:

#1- He is obsessed with the Harry Potter movies. He watches it every night to bed.

#2- He doesn't drink, EVER. He is naturally high on life!! 

What is one cool thing that fans should know about you?

I'm super competitive. I can pretty much beat Adam in anything that isn't related to dirt bikes or freestyle rapping. I can whoop his booty in a game of P.I.G, Monopoly and Tennis to name a few. 

What encouragement or advice would you have for other people who’s significant other is an aspiring pro racer?

Embrace the lows and the highs. Enjoy the ride! 

Be sure to give Ash and Adam a follow and stay tuned for more offerings.  Let us know what types of stories you want to keep reading. For more information on our experiences and shadowing our pro riders, check out our experiences page.

TCE MX Fan Experience NOW OPEN!

Want your chance to shadow a Pro MX team? How about some up close and personal time with the top Motocross racers in the world? Sound interesting? Well you're in luck! Back for 2018 is the TCE MX Fan Experience aimed to give race fans a behind the scenes unlike any other.  This is your shot at working with a Motocross team and gaining real life hands on experience.  Spend the day learning from the mechanics, trainers, team managers, and riders about what it takes to run a professional race team.  You will have a completely immersive experience all day long and we get you hooked up with major connections within the sport.  You get all day access to the team and pits to get as much out of the day as possible.  To top it all off we spoil you with goodies, swag bags, and extras throughout the day.  The best part about our program is that, through your participation we are able to help fund and support the hard working privateer riders and teams of our sport.  

We plan to hold the program with the Triggr Racing team featuring superstar privateer Henry Miller and the 3D Racing Team featuring 2017 top privateer Brandon Scharer at select rounds of the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship.  Want to find out more? Check out the experience link or send us an email.  Be sure to follow us on Instagram @thecollectiveex and stay up to date on all of our offerings.

TCE Perspective with Bradi Bowers

TCE Perspective with Bradi Bowers

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Ever wonder what the sport is like from a different perspective?  How about what it takes to support a professional athlete in one of the toughest sports there is?  Well, look no further because we are bringing you several exclusives with some bad-ass women who support some of the racers that we admire and look up to.  Last week we profiled Falan Vandemeer, fiancee turned mechanic for Brandon Scharer, to get her perspective on the sport and what goes into supporting and living with a pro Supercross racer.  This week we wanted to catch up with Bradi Bowers, wife of Factory Kawasaki supported rider Tyler Bowers.  Bradi is a huge hit with fans and has been around the sport for quite some time.  Bradi's insight into the sport is extremely valuable and can help others looking to make or support a career in the sport.

For the very-very few out there who may not be 100% familiar with Bradi Bowers, tell us a bit about yourself and who you are.

Hey guys, Bradi Bowers here! I'm the wife and baby momma to Tyler Bowers. I also work for Monster Energy as a Monster Energy girl at select races because… BABY, duh. I have been working in the industry for 9 years, so I have seen a lot and have my opinions. 

How did you meet Tyler and get involved in the sport? 

I had been working for my agent, Kelly Louch, since 2009 which led me working some Supercross (Florida) events that year. Then in 2010, I met Tyler at Baltimore Arenacross, which this was my first time working Arenacross with Monster Energy. 

Did you know about Motocross and Supercross prior to meeting him?

I knew about Supercross a little bit, at this time dirt bikes weren’t HUGE in Florida. Everyone was more about water-sports like wake boarding.

 Tyler is one of the most popular riders in the pits and has been racing professional for quite some time.  His success has led him to some great opportunities, such as his ride with factory Kawasaki this year, and to some great support.  Tyler's biggest support definitely comes from his wife Bradi.  photo credit:  @opbphotography

Tyler is one of the most popular riders in the pits and has been racing professional for quite some time.  His success has led him to some great opportunities, such as his ride with factory Kawasaki this year, and to some great support.  Tyler's biggest support definitely comes from his wife Bradi.

photo credit: @opbphotography

What were your initial thoughts about the sport?

Not going to lie, my first Arenacross, I thought "people actually do this for a living?"

What surprised you the most about the life of a professional Motocross and Supercross rider?

How much work goes into this sport as an athlete. The travel, training and recovery, its a full-time lifestyle!

How has his involvement in the sport shaped your relationship?

Loyalty. He’s very loyal and committed to his teams, his goals, and his passion. All which carries into other aspects of life, including our relationship.

 Even though Tyler has a very jammed packed schedule and is goes "all out" on  race day, he and Bradi always make time to convene and review throughout the day.  The two also make sure to bring baby Max with them to say hey to fans and bring Tyler some good luck.

Even though Tyler has a very jammed packed schedule and is goes "all out" on  race day, he and Bradi always make time to convene and review throughout the day.  The two also make sure to bring baby Max with them to say hey to fans and bring Tyler some good luck.

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Walk us through a day in the life of you two?

(Riding days) Tyler and I switch nights with Max, so depending on who watched the monitor at night, the other person gets up with her when she wakes up. One person watches baby, changes her diaper and gets her ready for day, as the other gets breakfast going. Max and I pick one day to do track day with Dad because she loves going to the track. So then we pack up her essentials, and off we go to the track. When we get back home from the track, Max usually takes a nap and Tyler goes for a cycle or gym workout. Then, we play with Max until bath time and we get her ready for bed together.

How do you impact his career/training?

Tyler likes to overdo it, he’s constantly trying to do more and everything he can to do better. That is not always a good thing.  I am very good at telling him to rest when he’s starting to run himself into the ground, and can’t quite see it for himself. I'm also very good at giving him a good kick in the ass when he’s lazy and needs someone to be real with him. I play both sides well.

What is the most stressful/negative part about sharing your life with a pro rider?

NO OFF DAYS! I think everyone in the industry has the same wedding anniversary date because there are no other dates open for a wedding during the racing/training season!

 Bradi has one of the coolest jobs at the races and spends most her day greeting and hanging out with her fans.  It's not very often that riders aren't the most popular one in their crew, but for Bradi and Tyler, she certainly draws in the crowds.  Bradi has been in the industry for a quite some time and has great insight into the sport and what it takes to be successful at a high level.

Bradi has one of the coolest jobs at the races and spends most her day greeting and hanging out with her fans.  It's not very often that riders aren't the most popular one in their crew, but for Bradi and Tyler, she certainly draws in the crowds.  Bradi has been in the industry for a quite some time and has great insight into the sport and what it takes to be successful at a high level.

What is the most exciting/best part?

I love to travel, so being able to share new locations or revisiting locations is great because I am with my other half. 

As someone who has an intimate connection to the sport, what would you like to see changed within the sport?

I would love to see more rides available, but I don’t know how or where the funding would come from for this. I would love to see more professionalism in certain positions at teams. We spent some time talking to people who are in NASCAR, and they are very quick to respond to proposals and calls, whether its positive or negative, its quite nice. 

What is one cool fact/thing about Tyler that fans should know?

He’s very loving for a bear.

 Tyler spends a lot of time with his family during week to keep things relaxed and to enjoy life.  Unlike most racers, Tyler has things figured out regarding his home life and race life.  Bradi and Max are never too far away at the races and can usually be found under the tent with Tyler.

Tyler spends a lot of time with his family during week to keep things relaxed and to enjoy life.  Unlike most racers, Tyler has things figured out regarding his home life and race life.  Bradi and Max are never too far away at the races and can usually be found under the tent with Tyler.

What is one cool thing that fans should know about you?

I actually have a dental hygiene degree.

What encouragement or advice would you have for other people who’s significant other is an aspiring pro racer?

Always have plan. Never quit believing in your worth. 

TCE Prize pack raffle- your chance to win big!

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The Collective Experience is excited to have an all new TCE Prize pack raffle! This is your chance to score big time on a bin full of amazing products from our great sponsors and supporters. Included in the prize pack will be apparel from FXR Racing, Rutted Racing, and Evans Power Coolant.  Also included in the prize pack are promo codes and coupons from FXR Racing, SGB Suspension, and Evans Power coolant.  Too top off this stellar prize pack we are also including several signed jerseys from our 2018 line up of Pro Supercross riders.  Riders such as Tyler Bowers, Brandon Scharer, Mike Akaydin, and Henry Miller have made contributions and a very lucky winner will receive them all.  Your support and purchase of each raffle ticket goes towards supporting our privateer program and directly impacts our hard working and dedicated riders along with their teams.  To enter and purchase your raffle ticket head over to https://raffles.ticketprinting.com/?r=7501

Be sure to check out our sponsors and their great product lines:

FXR Racing

Evans Power Coolant

Rutted Racing

BigMX Radio

Surge Unlimited

SGB Suspension

The Moto Hub

TCE Perspective with Falan Vandemeer

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In our sport a lot of the attention and spotlight is put onto the racers and team personnel, and for good reason.  After all, they are the main features of the racing, right?  Despite that being true, there are a lot of people behind the scenes that help to make each rider a success.  Arguably the most important among them are the wives and girlfriends of these star athletes.  They often wear many hats from mechanic, to personal cheerleader, to trainer, and most importantly their biggest fan.  Without them and their constant support, many riders wouldn't be to make through this tough sport that we all love.  We wanted to take a deep dive into the dynamic of a few racers and their significant others and get their perspectives on the sport, their home life, and their lives around the races.  Over the next few weeks we'll bring you exclusive looks into the lives of the women who make this sport and the racers they support so successful.  This week we caught up with Falan Vandemeer, fiancee to Brandon Scharer of the 3D Racing EBR Performance Yamaha team.

Hey Falan! Tell us a bit about yourself and who you are.

Well to start, my name is Falan (named after my dad Alan). Im 23, and currently I am a full time, online, college student working towards my Bachelor’s degree in English. When I am not at the races with Brandon on the weekends you can find me reading. I can read basically anything as long as it’s got a good story line.

How did you meet Brandon and get involved in the sport?

It all started at a family BBQ back in 2012, I was in my senior year of High School. One of my cousins happened to have Supercross on that night, it was the first round of the East Coast that season. It also happened to be Justin Bogles rookie race…that was the race that him and Malcolm crashed together, and I thought it was the coolest thing ever. I was hooked, and started watching Supercross, then Motocross from there on out. That same year my other cousin was getting ready to race a Loretta Lynn Regional Qualifier. My mom, step dad, and I went to the race to support him, and even though that was a stressful day for my cousin he was able to qualify! Then I started to go to any race of his I could, and decided to pick up a camera and try my hand at some moto photos. A year later I was still taking photos, really enjoying it and possibly thinking of pursuing it as a career, when I took some photos at a local event…the Transworld Slam to be more specific. I went home that evening and began to edit photos, unsure of who half the guys were in the photos (I was still learning about the sport), when I stumbled upon a photo that I really liked. There was dirt flying in the photo which was in focus, while the rider in the background was turning in a berm somewhat out of focus. He didn’t have any numbers on his bike so I had no idea who he was. At the time I was trying to promote my photos on social media, and I uploaded the photo and said just that, “One of my favorite shots, but I have no idea who the rider is”. Against all odds…a person I didn’t follow, and who didn’t follow me, tagged the rider who was none other than, you guessed it, Brandon! After Brandon was tagged in the photo we started talking, and he asked me out on our first date not long after. 

Did you know a alot about Motocross and Supercross prior to meeting him?

Somewhat yes…I had started watching it a year prior to us meeting, but I had no idea what the sport was really all about.

What were your initial thoughts about the sport?

Super exciting! One of the better sports I was into! At the time I was going to school to be a sports journalist, and I was set on being a reporter for SX and MX, that’s how much I loved it.

What surprised you the most about the life of a professional Motocross and Supercross rider?

The amount of work they have to put into the sport, which such little payback to them.

How has his involvement in the sport shaped your relationship?

One thing for sure, if it wasn’t for Brandon and his racing I wouldn’t have had such amazing life experiences. I’ve travelled to so many new places, “survived” a motorhome fire (which includes all my clothes being destroyed/burnt), and I've even been Brandon’s #fakemechanic, which has hands down made us stronger as a couple. I’d be lying if I said racing wasn’t both of our main priorities, and it’s what we plan our lives around…and I’m perfectly okay with that. In fact, if Brandon stopped racing I wouldn’t know what to do…it would be really weird.

 Falan has been an integral part of Brandon's program the last couple of years.  Not only does she help him during the week, but she also doubles as his mechanic!

Falan has been an integral part of Brandon's program the last couple of years.  Not only does she help him during the week, but she also doubles as his mechanic!

Walk us through a day in the life of you two?

To be honest, we’re a pretty “boring” couple. We don’t stray too far from our normal program. Our typical day would be Brandon waking up super early to start getting ready to head out to practice, which involves him having to force me out of bed as well. We go to practice together, he rides while I sit in the car and read whatever book I’m reading. After practice he washes and preps the bike, while I’m still reading. Then we head towards home, go to the gym for an hour or two (which he has to force me to go to as well). Then we go home and by then it’s time for dinner. Finally it’s time for bed; we actually call ourselves an “old couple” because more often than not we are in bed by 9pm. Sometimes we watch our favorite show “How I met your mother”, but only if we’re able to stay up a little late, Brandon is usually knocked out halfway through the first episode. 

How do you impact his career/training?

I give all the credit to Brandon. He is his own mechanic/trainer/racer. If it wasn’t for him and his own motivation, and his downright love for the sport he would not be racing still. All I am there for is to support him when he needs me.

What is the most stressful/negative part about sharing your life with a pro rider?

Number one, would be the constant fear that he will get hurt. I don’t care if he breaks a pinky, it absolutely kills me to see him in any sort of pain. Being his #fakemechanic actually keeps me sane on race days because instead of worrying about him getting hurt I’m focused on getting his lap times/positions during the race.

Number two would be the instability of things. Unfortunately, there is nothing permanent in this sport…one day you could be the biggest thing out there, the next people forget who your name is. You have to be committed to going all in, and being able to go with the flow. This is includes moving, not having work, living on the road…etc.

 The bond between a rider and their mechanic is very important.  Falan arguably has one of the best bonds out their with her fiancee Brandon.

The bond between a rider and their mechanic is very important.  Falan arguably has one of the best bonds out their with her fiancee Brandon.

What is the most exciting/best part?

On the other hand I would say the instability of the sport is what makes it so exciting. You never know opportunity is going to be coming next. Five years ago, I would never have thought that I would have travelled to as many places that I have been to.  Another thing I love is the fact that I have met so many lifelong friends through the sport. Shout out to our friends Brent and Christina, whom I wouldn’t have met if it wasn’t for Brandon and his racing!

As someone who has an intimate connection to the sport, what would you like to see changed within the sport?

I just wish there was a broader industry, not just like five factory teams…If there were more opportunities for privateers I guarantee that if you put over half of them on a factory bike you would be surprised with the results. But unfortunately, only a handful of racers will ever get that opportunity and it’s a shame. This ties in with the money issue as well…I think if there were more racers on factory bikes, the racing would be more exciting, more sponsors would pitch in money because there would be more viewers, and overall the racers would be able to live off of the salary that they are getting. Money is definitely an issue. Just my opinion.

What is one cool fact/thing about Brandon that fans should know?

One funny thing I can come up with is that he is ambidextrous, making him really hard to eat with because he can never decide what hand he wants to use and he’s constantly elbowing me!  Also,  he’s actually a decent golfer…he somehow even got me into watching golf with him! And enjoying it!

What is one cool thing that fans should know about you?

Aside from me liking to read,  I also love to write as well. That’s actually what I am going to school for, to be an author. I’m currently working on my first fiction novel…so who knows; maybe one day you will see my name on the cover of a book!

 TCE rider Brandon has had a successful past couple of seasons, each of which he has had Falan in his corner 24/7.

TCE rider Brandon has had a successful past couple of seasons, each of which he has had Falan in his corner 24/7.

What encouragement or advice would you have for other people who’s significant other is an aspiring pro racer?

Hang in there and be as supportive as you can! Things can get really difficult sometimes, but that is when you really have to step it up as a girlfriend. You are their best friend, and essentially one of the only people that they will listen to. Constantly encourage them, and support them. Don’t be afraid to go with the flow, and don’t be afraid when things get out of control. They know what they are doing, and you also have to trust them, just like they trust you (even if they sometimes don’t show it). Also, don’t be afraid to live your own life outside of racing as well. You deserve a future just as much as they deserve a future in racing! 

TCE athlete AJ Catanzaro featured on Racerxonline.com

 Photo courtesy of Cole Beach Photography

Photo courtesy of Cole Beach Photography

The Collective Experience rider AJ Catanzaro was featured in a Racer X online article where he had the opportunity to share his thoughts and insights as a racer with the public.  Around the pits AJ is known for his charismatic nature and is more than informative when it comes to discussing the sport.  Topics like the race tracks of 2018, top rider injuries, and the current 2018 season happenings were talked about.  Believe it or not, but it is very rare for riders and racers to share their thoughts openly and many fans commented on the refreshingly opened nature of the article.  Be sure to check out the article here and support privateer rider AJ Catanzaro by following him on social media along with signing up for a TCE SX Fan Experience package with him.  Stay tuned for more great content and news from behind the scenes of Supercross.

 Photo courtesy of Cole Beach Photography

Photo courtesy of Cole Beach Photography

TCE Dream Chasers with Derrick Sorensen

TCE Dream Chasers with Derrick Sorensen

How cool is it when we get a chance to do something we love? For us Moto folks, we get this feeling anytime we swing a leg over a bike.  Now imagine getting to do your dream job!  It must be exhilerating doing something you love day in and day out and actually getting paid to do it. Those lucky few really know what it takes to make this happen and we love to pick their brains anytime we can to see how we can inspire others to do the same in the sport we all love.  This month we checked in with a young technician on the Rockwell Racing team, Derrick Sorensen, to see how he is living his dream...

 Image: @browndogwilson

Image: @browndogwilson

Tell us a bit about who you are and what you do…

My name is Derrick Sorensen, but I’m known as Drizzy in the pits, I am 19 years old. I’m originally from Utah currently living in Arizona. My life outside of being a race technician consists of being a general mechanic.  I guess if I’m not outdoors mountain biking, camping, or shooting I’m probably working on my car or someone else’s car or bike. I’m the type of person who loves to be tinkering with things and I love problem solving.

How did you get into Moto?

Unlike most people in the industry or sport I didn’t grow up racing and I didn’t start riding until “later” in life when I was 12. I was always into sports and I always wanted a dirt bike, but it wasn’t really financially possible until I was 12. From then on out my story is the same as everyone else’s.  I fell in love with it.

What motivated you to be a tech?

Since I started riding late I wasn’t going to make a career out of riding. I hadn’t thought about making dirt bikes my career until my sophomore year of high school when my 250 blew up. I mean I was always fixing things and taking things apart and was mechanically inclined, but really my only experience working on bikes was stuff I learned from YouTube when my bike was having issues.  Things like how to clean the carburetor, fix a sticky throttle cable, setting sag, and other stuff like that, but when my bike blew up I had to find someone. So I started searching online for a good shop and ended up finding Matt Jory at Proven Moto. It turned out that his shop was only like 7 minutes away from my house and once I found out his background in racing I knew that I wanted him to build my bike. It wasn’t until I met him and saw his shop that I first had the thought that the only way to be at the races on Saturdays as anything other than a spectator was to be a professional race technician. Money was still tight then and so he told me that if I brought him the motor out of the bike it would be cheaper. I pulled the motor out that night and brought it to him the next day. Once the motor was done I picked it up and put the whole bike back together. The first time I started that bike up it was so satisfying to know that I had the bike torn down to the frame and then put it all back together, so the idea of being a race technician was set in stone

 Derrick has been wrenching for AJ Catanzaro on the West coast rounds of the 2018 Monster Energy Supercross series.  This is Derrick's first year working with a higher profile rider and he has learned a lot in a short amount of time.    Image: @browndogwilson

Derrick has been wrenching for AJ Catanzaro on the West coast rounds of the 2018 Monster Energy Supercross series.  This is Derrick's first year working with a higher profile rider and he has learned a lot in a short amount of time.  

Image: @browndogwilson

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 How did you start your on your path to becoming a professional tech?

 Once I decided I wanted to be a technician I knew that I needed to get more involved in racing and make the transition from single track rider to racer, so through Matt I met Colby Sorensen. Colby is a local pro in Utah and was starting a riding school. I took a few lessons, but again money was tight. Colby was great and said that if I came and helped him maintain his track and help with some of the younger kids then I could ride for free and he’d give me pointers every now and then. But I still needed to figure out where I was going to  learn more. Enter the ever so attention grabbing MMI Facebook ad. I went from clicking on the ad to having a recruiter at my door in the matter of a few days and I ended up enrolling. My start date wouldn’t be until after I graduated highschool, so there was still a lot of time for me to change my mind, but I stayed involved and actually was taking auto shop at the time and found out about a competition called skillsUSA where highschool kids compete at the state level in various trades. Well it turned out there was a motorcycle mechanic competition and if you placed you got scholarship to MMI. I found out how to get signed up and my first year competing (I was a junior at the time) I took third in state and won 3000 dollars in scholarship money to MMI so after that there was really no going back.

Going into my senior year I was planning on competing again and  winning, so I spent months practicing, but only ended up taking second in state.  It was good for another 5000 dollars in scholarship money. After graduation I worked for the summer and then moved out to Arizona to go to MMI. I learned very quick that MMI sets you up to go to a dealer and not to go to a team, so I reached out to as many people as I could asking if anyone would let me come to the races even if it was just to wash bikes. I really just made everything in my life revolve around bikes and doing well at MMI. Eventually, after messaging people another pro from Utah Shawn Yarbrough messaged me back and said he could use help at Phoenix and believe it or not that was my first time even being at a Supercross race. It was one hell of a way to experience Supercross for the first time. It was a dream come true, and after that I ended up helping Devin Sorensen (also no relation) out in St. Louis.

From there it was basically just messaging everyone I could and trying to go from round to round and help people out while going to school. One of the people that I also ended up helping out was Bryce Stewart at Salt Lake. We clicked well and I told him if he needed any more help to let me know. Bryce also mentioned he might need help at the first three rounds of outdoors and so from then on out I kinda stuck with him. I drove out to Vegas SX to be there for him and ended up driving back and forth from Phoenix to his house in California every weekend until the AMA Outdoor Nationals started. Things were going well and I decided that I wanted to take a break from school and stick with him when racing headed east. I was with him up until about Unadilla. Once I got back to school I started the MMI K-Tech program and was talking with Devin about doing east coast once I graduated. (We’re pretty good buddies now so shout out to him!).  I ended up finding out that Rockwell watches had a team and needed someone. Shawn was working for Rockwell at the time so I hit him up and got in contact with Ryan Clark the team owner and Chris Elliot the team manager and sent in my resume. I guess they liked what they saw and said I had a spot on the team, the only problem was I was supposed to take the Suzuki fast program and I wasn’t gonna graduate until February, well I decided real quick I’d be better off working with the team than taking Suzuki so I dropped it and graduated as soon as I finished K-Tech at MMI. I graduated on a Thursday and was at the track that Friday. I’ve been with them ever since.

What are your daily responsibilities as a technician for Rockwell?

 My day to day responsibilities for Rockwell Racing depend on if it’s a regular weekday or race day. During the week I usually will wash the bike and tear it down on Monday and clean,grease and polish everything on Tuesday, and assemble on Wednesday. I like to just put music on and go through my routine. I try to talk to my rider AJ Catanzaro during the week and form a game plan for the weekend and debrief, if you will, about the past race. During the weekend my job is pretty simple, myself and fellow Rockwell Racing mechanic Eric a.k.a. "Jelly" set up the semi and get the bikes through AMA tech inspection. Saturdays are usually pretty crazy and the only things I worry about are the bike and AJ. The bikes get ran through and checked over completely before they go out for each practice and race. And besides that I just make sure AJ is happy with the bike and doesn’t want to make any changes. 

During the pre-season and off time I am responsible for maintaining the shop and fixing or fabrication various things around the shop. Me and Jelly usually team up to take inventory and clean. Going back to race day it’s for sure awesome to be with Rockwell because there’s always a crowd of people and there’s so much going on with Nuclear Blasts set up and the Justified crew doing their thing selling their apparel. I mean for A2 FXR brought out a really trick snowmobile and at Houston we had a fully set up Timbersled, so that brings a lot of people over.

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 Rockwell is one of the coolest teams in the pits.  What is the vibe like under the tent with the guys from your perspective?

 As far as the team goes everyone vibes pretty well. Ryan Clark is definitely the mentor type and is so helpful to have around, Chris is like the team mother in a way because he is always making sure everyone has what they need and everyone is taken care of.  Chris Sharpe handles things on Rockwell’s end and is always keeping things running smoothly and brings the two sides together really nice. Jim is our team cook and is the unsung hero. There’s not a single person that doesn’t help out in their own small, but major way. That’s why it’s a team because everyone has a job and without all the great people on the team things wouldn’t be possible. Over all I think the vibe is really easy going, a lot of teams have their area so roped off where as we always have people over and up close to the action checking out watches talking to riders, and talking with the Justified crew. It’s cool that so many people in the industry rep our gear so it’s just cool to be a part of that

 What is it like working with AJ? What are some things that make him stand out from other riders?

 I’ve really liked working with AJ because for one I am a fan and so when I found out I was gonna be working with him I kinda had a "fan-girl" moment.  AJ’s definitely very laid back and usually doesn’t ask for a lot and doesn’t change a lot of things so it makes my job really easy.  I’m a little bit of a jokester so it’s nice to know I can joke with him and he can take it and it doesn’t throw him off his game. I think what sets him apart is just how likable he is.  It seams like he always has a long autograph line and is always talking to someone. Plus I mean it’s the "Cat" and everyone knows he’s got a nasty style and flow. It’s hard not being able to work together durning the week, but I feel like we’ve got a pretty solid rapport going.

 What is it like being on the floor during an SX race?

To be on the gate during the night show is unreal! It’s so cool to see all the people and know that there’s people in the stands that wish they could be in your shoes. It’s so cool to me when people will see me after the race when we go out to eat and say, " Hey nice job the bike looked great all day" or people will ask me questions about the bike while I’m doing my run through and it almost makes you feel like a celebrity.  It’s just cool to be a part of something especially when it’s your dream. Not very many people get to live their dream so it’s rad.

 What is the most fun thing about your role?

 Again, I’d have to say the most fun thing about being a technician is being on the floor and talking to people and getting to see the bikes on tv or pictures and knowing that you were a part of that.  But I’d also say that being with the team and going to dinner or joking around after the race is always fun too. Really it’s all fun no matter how much hard work it takes I love it.

 Derrick works under the Rockwell Racing tent and seems to be really liking the squad.  The Rockwell team sets themselves apart with a great atmosphere, open and welcoming staff, and great displays for fans.

Derrick works under the Rockwell Racing tent and seems to be really liking the squad.  The Rockwell team sets themselves apart with a great atmosphere, open and welcoming staff, and great displays for fans.

What are some things you’ve learned that you didn’t expect to?

I think the biggest thing I’ve learned that maybe I didn’t think I would is really just how much it really takes to keep a team going and how much effort everyone has to put in. I’ve learned how to be better at certain things and definitely how to be resourceful, but I expected to learn that. So by far it’s just seeing how much goes into things

 What are some misconceptions that people have about tech’s?

I think the biggest misconception people have about techs is that we only work on bikes, where as I have many different hats and play many roles. It’s really a full time thing and a lifestyle. I also think people assume we have secrets and use magic when really it’s just a lot of common sense, practice, and routine. It definitely takes more than just being a good mechanic though , you have to know how to talk to your rider, play mental coach, and sometimes detective.

What is one thing that you would change about the industry if you could?

 It’s hard to find something I’d change about the industry just because honestly this sport is so great. But if I could change one thing about the industry it’d probably be how expensive it is to be a part of. Tracks are getting more and more expensive to ride at. Bikes cost more than ever. Gear is expensive. I know it kept me out of racing when I was younger and I feel like it’s keeping a lot of other people out of the sport too.

 How do you overcome the fear of starting out at this level and making mistakes?

 I think for me I was never afraid of starting out because it’s what I wanted to do. I wanted to get my shot and I wasn’t afraid of mistakes because I knew I was going to make them. I think the biggest help for me has been just telling myself that I belong. New things are always scary to some degree, but it’s important to just embrace it

 What are some skills that others can use to get where you are?

 I’d say the most important skill you can have as a mechanic is the ability to think outside the box and be organized. Organization is key! Give yourself timelines and schedules or a routine or list. Find what works for you and refine it. But by far the most important skill to have to get to where I’m at (which isn’t very far by the way, I’ve yet to accomplish anything substantial) is perseverance. People skills help a lot as well. I’ve quit jobs to go racing, I’ve been broke, I’ve lost sleep, I’ve invested all my time and energy into my goal.

 Derrick pours tons of effort and long hours into AJ's bike.  No detail is too small when working with athletes at these level.

Derrick pours tons of effort and long hours into AJ's bike.  No detail is too small when working with athletes at these level.

 What advice do you have for other young tech’s who are just starting out?

 So to summarize I think what it boils down to for me is the fact that I’m never satisfied, no matter what I do I know I can do better, and the key for me is I’m brutally honest with myself. I sit down and evaluate things and I think to myself, "Am I really doing absolutely everything I can be? Where can I improve and if somethings not working am I tryin to change it?" I think that knowing I’ll make mistakes like everyone does (even the top mechanics and riders do), but choosing to learn from them instead of getting discouraged about it has helped. When I make a mistake it lights a fire underneath my ass because I see it as a spot to learn and grow. But at the same time instead of worrying about what I’m not good at I found what I was good at and doubled down on it and became tunnel visioned. It just happens that dirtbikes was that thing that I found. So anyone that wants to do this can if they really want it. You can't just say that you want it. There’s no reason that anyone can’t be or do anything they want. The formula is simply hard work and dedication. The best place to start is changing what you can immediately to be better, so don’t wait to meet the right people. Instead go find them! Don’t wait to be taught, go learn! Go to the track or go work on your own bike. Just make everything you do in life about achieving your goal. Then, once you get your shot worry about refining your craft, being organized, getting a routine, trying new things and always-always try to learn more.

Stay tuned for more stories and exclusives with industry insiders...

TCE Check in with FXR's Cade Clason...

TCE Check in with FXR's Cade Clason...

Pro SX racer Cade Clason has had quite a busy career as of late.  In 2017, he had a great AMA Supercross season as he grew his popularity and fanbase ten-fold and raced in several main events.  Not bad for a privateer racer.  For 2018, Cade has some new ventures that he is embarking on.  We caught up with Cade to get the inside dirt on his career to date along with where he is taking things for 2018 and beyond....

 Cade has a very big fans base in Canada and relishes his experience traveling up north and competing.

Cade has a very big fans base in Canada and relishes his experience traveling up north and competing.

Hey Cade! For those out there who may not be as familiar with you as others, tell us a bit about yourself?

 I’m 23 years old, I grew up racing and going to school in Ohio, but for the last several years I have been living down in South Carolina. I have raced dirt bikes basically my entire life, but I also enjoy golfing, fishing and being around friends. I recently got engaged also, so there is plenty going on in my life.  

How did you get started in the sport?

Well my parents were horse trainers and I grew up on a farm. One of their client's sons raced and I had a bike and got invited out to go riding with them and basically have been hooked ever since. 

Tell us about the last few season as a privateer? 

Honestly, some people think that being a privateer is the worst thing ever and for me it really isn't. Obviously, being on a big team with a lot of money makes everything way easier, but being a privateer is something special that I don’t think some of the factory team guys really know what it is like. Its harder yes, money is always tight and you don’t always get or have everything you need. But while doing it, you make amazing friends and meet so many people that you would never get to if you were on a big team. You get to interact with fans and sponsors more and thats why I think so many people have a different kind of respect for privateers. But for me, I can’t say that I have had any issues with it. I have almost always had great people behind me that wanted to see me succeed as much as I did so that was what was important. 

 Cade had a successful run in 2017 and made strides throughout the season.  His popularity soared with each round of the series.

Cade had a successful run in 2017 and made strides throughout the season.  His popularity soared with each round of the series.

You’re pretty popular around the pits with riders and fans.  What can you attribute to your popularity within the sport?

Honestly, I have no idea.  I feel like when Alex Ray and I became such good friends and we started doing everything and going places together.  People really started to notice us both and it grew both of our images. We both like meeting new people and talking to fans so that might be part of the reason because some people just don’t take the time to do those things and its really important. 

It’s no secret that you’re sitting out a few seasons due to some issues with the FIM and AMA.  Can you give us your 2 cents on where that all stands?

Honestly, I can’t right now, basically we have made some head way with the situation and getting it some what straightened out, but nothing great or set in stone. I should know more in the next couple of weeks…… hopefully. 

Since then you have gotten yourself into a pretty sweet new gig with FXR Racing, can you tell us about it?

Yeah, Its something I actually have really been enjoying. I get to go to different types of FXR events and races or photo shoots and basically be a rep for them. I bring stuff to the races for guys and help out two of our head guys at the office to take a little bit of stress off them. Its just something fun to get my foot in the door and experience new things so It is actually really cool and I can’t thank them enough for the opportunity. 

 Cade joined the TCE squad in 2017 and added to the impressive roster of dedicated and hard working privateer athletes.

Cade joined the TCE squad in 2017 and added to the impressive roster of dedicated and hard working privateer athletes.

How does your experience in the sport help you in this new role?

I have spent a few years around this sport racing and I have dealt with a lot of good and or difficult people. Learning from those people/situations and putting my experiences into place I just hope to help and treat the guys at the races the way that I would have liked to be treated.  We have a lot of riders that I am really close with so it is fun to go and help them succeed. 

Tell us a bit about a few things that you’ve learned in this new role that you didn’t expect to or that surprised you.

Some guys just love complaining. I always thought it was just Alex (Ray), but some people are almost as bad. 

What are your plans or goals for the rest of the year?

Well, I am planning on heading back to Canada to race this summer, so I just started training again for that. Besides that, not a whole lot. I’ve been taking some college courses online so that takes up some of my time and I also love hiking so I want to go on another trip somewhere out west this fall!

 Cade's talent and passion for riding landed him some great support when he competed up north in Canada.  Cade plans to travel back to Canada to compete in 2018.

Cade's talent and passion for riding landed him some great support when he competed up north in Canada.  Cade plans to travel back to Canada to compete in 2018.

Where do you see your career going in the future?

With all that is going on with me right now its hard to say. I would love to say I will be racing supercross for the next 10 years, but I have no way to back that up. I would love to get a job in the industry doing something, but like I said I am still so in the dark about my future with racing it is hard to be sure about anything and what direction I am heading. 

As for racing up north in Canada, what are some of the major differences between the Canadian series races and the US series races?

Well with the new series that is starting up there this year it will be a complete reset, but it is just so laid back up there. Everyone is so friendly and helpful it makes it a lot of fun to be around. For myself, it is really competitive with more people my speed.  I can contend for podiums and top 5’s so it really gives me realistic goals to work towards! 

 Extremely likable and charismatic, Cade has a bright future ahead of him in the industry wether or not that's on the bike or supporting riders much like himself.

Extremely likable and charismatic, Cade has a bright future ahead of him in the industry wether or not that's on the bike or supporting riders much like himself.

Cade has a lot of cool things going on in 2018.  He's a great example of the awesome opportunities that are available within the sport after racing is over or when you are ready for a change.  Following your interest and passion can really lead you down some fulfilling and rewarding paths.  What opportunities and positions in the sport would YOU want to take on?  To follow along with Cade's journey and to stay up to date on his latest ventures be sure to follow him on social media.  Stay tuned for more in-depth articles and stories centered around the sport and the people who dedicate themselves to it.

Cade Clason Instagram

Moto Fitness with Nicole Nathan of Hayward Fit Fans

Moto Fitness with Nicole Nathan of Hayward Fit Fans

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When it comes to Motocross and Supercross it goes without say that it’s a fairly unique sport.  There’s nothing quite like it in the world and it’s physical demand can’t even be replicated.  The mantra, “ Nothing beats seat time” rings true in every rider’s ear as we try to condition ourselves in gyms across the world.  Often times training for this sport off the bike requires highly certified trainers, specialized equipment, and rigorous routines. Despite this, there is one physical practice that has seen a rise in popularity due to it’s direct benefit to racers in many disciplines.  It promotes flexibility, cardio vascular health, muscle strength, and much more.  Even the most high profile trainers are implementing this into their programs to help their athletes.  What practice are we talking about?  Well, it’s one that you might not have considered.  The practice is Yoga.  Trainers like the legendary former racer Ryan “Ryno” Hughes boast about it’s unique mental and physical benefits and how elite riders everywhere can elevate their game even further by practicing yoga.  We wanted to fully understand the true benefits of Yoga and it's direct application to Motocross and Supercross so we reached out to Nicole Nathan, a highly experienced Yoga practitioner who has ties to the sport.  Nicole gave us her two cents on the background of yoga and how even the everyday rider can use it to improve their health and riding...

Hey Nicole! Give us a bit of your background in the sport and within the yoga world?

I began teaching group fitness in college and decided to make Health and Fitness Promotion my career. I opened a fitness studio in my hometown and really wanted to learn about yoga as part of my teaching repertoire. I absolutely fell in love with it and yoga has now become my central focus. Motocross has not always been in my life, either. 15 years ago I started dating Chas Kadlec who rode bikes and raced in the summers and I would be hauling all over with him to races. I admit at first I wasn't a huge fan, but over time I really started to admire racers and what they were doing. When I started practicing yoga, I'd be doing poses back behind the trailer on race weekends so I had something to do other than wash gear and spectate. A couple years ago, Chas started Triggr Racing and it became an even bigger part of our lives, by default I became a Motocross/Supercross super-fan and now I've gotten to take my yoga practice all over the united states. I'm that weird gal doing handstands in the pits.  :)

 Nicole is a huge part of the Triggr Racing team and spends her time supporting the riders and Chas, the team manager/owner, with anything from meals to pre race Yoga workouts.

Nicole is a huge part of the Triggr Racing team and spends her time supporting the riders and Chas, the team manager/owner, with anything from meals to pre race Yoga workouts.

Explain the main idea behind yoga and some of the principles?

The word yoga can be translated as "to yoke" or "to unite" and is typically explained as a union or a method of discipline. The main principals integrate 5,000-year-old Vedic wisdom with modern interpretations, creating a philosophical road map for daily yoga practice to help unite body, mind, and spirit. These ancient principals consist of what are called the eight limbs of yoga: the yamas (restraints), niyamas (observances), asana (postures), pranayama (breathing), pratyahara (withdrawal of senses), dharana (concentration), dhyani (meditation), and samadhi (absorption).  Most people today who are practicing yoga are engaged in the third limb - asana. It's a physical program consisting of postures and poses designed to purify and strengthen the body while creating better stamina and flexibility. 

 How is it different from other forms of fitness work?

Some people see yoga and physical fitness as very different things. The definition of 'exercise' is "bodily exertion for the sake of developing and maintaining physical fitness."  Traditionally, physical fitness, although maybe a welcome by-product of the yoga practice, was not the purpose of yoga to begin with. Yoga was done, traditionally, for enlightenment. Nowadays, with all the hybrid forms of yoga like yoga sculpt and cycle yoga it's hard not to become confused as to why yoga is not considered 'exercise'. To me, it just depends on what kind of yoga you are doing. From my perspective, yoga and exercise are close cousins, but they didn't really know it at first. 

What sort of benefits does it have on the body?

What I love most about yoga is the relationship you build with your body and your mental strength. Almost all forms for exercise are aimed at building muscle and improving overall fitness, but yoga does that and helps you develop an inward awareness. Many people see yoga as beneficial for flexibility and stress relief only, but yoga also increases cardiorespiratory fitness, circulation, purification of organs and blood, improved musculoskeletal strength and injury prevention. That's a biggie! Yoga trains you to be more aware of your body; it slows us down and helps remind us to take care of ourselves.  

 Last year Nicole was able to work with privateer hero Henry Miller and use her expertise in Yoga to get him stretched out and primed before each Pro race.

Last year Nicole was able to work with privateer hero Henry Miller and use her expertise in Yoga to get him stretched out and primed before each Pro race.

How can Motocross and Supercross riders benefit from yoga?

I'll answer your question with a question - how can riders NOT benefit from yoga!? haha I truly believe all people can benefit from some form or yoga or another. Profesional Motocross and Supercross riders are some of the most elite athletes in the world and yet even your weekend-warrior amateurs are in need of some physical training to compete. The demands of riding a dirt bike are limitless and it requires stamina, coordination, balance, alertness, and serious strength to push a 250 pound metal mule around.  Because we know yoga can do all these amazing things to help improve our body's physical and mental systems, riders of all levels should be capitalizing! The main ways I believe someone can benefit, specifically riders, are injury prevention, core strength, balance, muscular endurance and focus/mental awareness. 

What was it like for you working with a pro rider in 2017? 

Experiencing Motocross and Supercross from behind the scenes the last few seasons really gave me a new perspective and appreciation for these athletes. Especially a guy like Henry Miller who is so dedicated physically, emotionally and mentally to his passion. He trains, eats, thinks, communicates like the elite athlete he is. Being around that definitely made me look at my own career and my personal growth differently in the sense that - what we do on a daily basis matters to getting us closer toward self-mastery. Whatever it is, if you find balance and are dedicated to your training/learning/growing..... then it’s all possible! 

 Were you able to help him with fitness or flexibility with yoga?

Truthfully it was never a formal arrangement, I think Yoga was just happening naturally wherever we were together. Like I said, I was doing poses all over the pits so it was just there.  Henry already knew quite a bit of yoga and practiced regularly at Clubmx even before we met. Generally, we’d be hanging around in the camper, hotel room or wherever just stretching together or I’d offer to help him loosen up the way he felt he needed to before a race. I’m pretty sure I was doling out some Thai Yoga bodywork to all the Triggr racing crew at some point.  

Do you think we will see yoga having a bigger presence in the sport?

Without a doubt! I know trainers like Ryan Hughes and Roman Brown are big believers in utilizing yoga for training motocross/supercross. Yoga already has a presence in the elite sports and fitness world and I feel it will continue to make it's way into the mainstream. 

What are some basic yoga routines or poses that could help or benefit the everyday rider?

 Chaturanga - I like to call this "Cowabunga" because it's fun but difficult. Core, Arms, Wrists will benefit from strength and flexibility. Because of the difficulty of the pose, start in plank pose, begin by lowering your knees to the floor and then, with an exhale, lower your sternum to a few inches from the floor to build up to the full movement with legs fully extended. 

Chaturanga - I like to call this "Cowabunga" because it's fun but difficult. Core, Arms, Wrists will benefit from strength and flexibility. Because of the difficulty of the pose, start in plank pose, begin by lowering your knees to the floor and then, with an exhale, lower your sternum to a few inches from the floor to build up to the full movement with legs fully extended. 

 Downward Facing Dog - Calms the brain, reduces stress, energizes the body, stretches the shoulders, hamstrings and calves, strengthens the hands, arms and legs - just to name a few benefits. Start with feet shoulder width apart and knees very bent, as you progress you can begin to bring the feet closer together (hip width apart) and extend the knees more. 

Downward Facing Dog - Calms the brain, reduces stress, energizes the body, stretches the shoulders, hamstrings and calves, strengthens the hands, arms and legs - just to name a few benefits. Start with feet shoulder width apart and knees very bent, as you progress you can begin to bring the feet closer together (hip width apart) and extend the knees more. 

 Chair Pose - This is of the best poses for building the resilience of the legs, upper back and core. It also stretches the ankles, thighs, calves and spine. You can increase the strength of your thighs by squeezing a block or thick book between them during this pose. 

Chair Pose - This is of the best poses for building the resilience of the legs, upper back and core. It also stretches the ankles, thighs, calves and spine. You can increase the strength of your thighs by squeezing a block or thick book between them during this pose. 

 Dancer Pose - Quadriceps, Hip Flexors, Chest and Shoulders receive a nice opening in this pose and it's an excellent balance enhancer. Dont get frustrated if you find balance to be difficult; try to focus on something out in front of you, keep your spine long and keep your standing knee slightly bent. 

Dancer Pose - Quadriceps, Hip Flexors, Chest and Shoulders receive a nice opening in this pose and it's an excellent balance enhancer. Dont get frustrated if you find balance to be difficult; try to focus on something out in front of you, keep your spine long and keep your standing knee slightly bent. 

 Crescent Lunge Pose- Releases tension in the groin and hip muscles while toning the legs and back. Excellent for preventing injury and if done in moderation can abate back/sciatic pain. For beginners, place the back knee down on the floor for support until strength and flexibility increase. 

Crescent Lunge Pose- Releases tension in the groin and hip muscles while toning the legs and back. Excellent for preventing injury and if done in moderation can abate back/sciatic pain. For beginners, place the back knee down on the floor for support until strength and flexibility increase. 

 Pyramid Pose - Strengthens Legs. Stretches Legs, Hips & Hamstrings. Improves Sense of Balance. Calms the brain. Optional arm placement: bring the hands behind the back and hold each elbow with the opposite hand to stretch the shoulders and chest. Keep the front knee slightly bent to relieve tension in the hamstring and press into the back heel to keep it from lifting off the floor.

Pyramid Pose - Strengthens Legs. Stretches Legs, Hips & Hamstrings. Improves Sense of Balance. Calms the brain. Optional arm placement: bring the hands behind the back and hold each elbow with the opposite hand to stretch the shoulders and chest. Keep the front knee slightly bent to relieve tension in the hamstring and press into the back heel to keep it from lifting off the floor.

 Boat Pose - Amazing abdominal, hip flexor and spine fortifier. Improves digestion and helps relieve stress. Work to keep the spine very straight. To Challenge yourself in this pose: try extending the legs up. 

Boat Pose - Amazing abdominal, hip flexor and spine fortifier. Improves digestion and helps relieve stress. Work to keep the spine very straight. To Challenge yourself in this pose: try extending the legs up. 

 Seated Twist improves posture and spinal health. Stimulates digestive fire and tones liver and kidneys. 

Seated Twist improves posture and spinal health. Stimulates digestive fire and tones liver and kidneys. 

 Child's Pose - Gently relaxes the hips, thighs and ankles. Great for reducing stress and back/neck pain. 

Child's Pose - Gently relaxes the hips, thighs and ankles. Great for reducing stress and back/neck pain. 

 Child's Pose Option 2 - Bending the elbows and bringing the hands behind the head offers an additional chest, tricep, latissimus stretch which can also fight fatigue. 

Child's Pose Option 2 - Bending the elbows and bringing the hands behind the head offers an additional chest, tricep, latissimus stretch which can also fight fatigue. 

 Standing Straddle Bend - Calms the brain by brining blood flow to the head. Strengthens and stretches the inner and backs of legs. Relieves spinal compression and tones the organs. Hands can come down to the floor, if preferred.  

Standing Straddle Bend - Calms the brain by brining blood flow to the head. Strengthens and stretches the inner and backs of legs. Relieves spinal compression and tones the organs. Hands can come down to the floor, if preferred.  

 Garland Pose - Tones the belly and digestive system. Improves flexibility of the ankles, hips and back. Be careful if you have low back or knee injuries. 

Garland Pose - Tones the belly and digestive system. Improves flexibility of the ankles, hips and back. Be careful if you have low back or knee injuries. 

 Bridge Pose - Opens the chest, lungs, neck, quadriceps and spine. Helps to reduce anxiety, fatigue, headaches, backaches and insomnia. 

Bridge Pose - Opens the chest, lungs, neck, quadriceps and spine. Helps to reduce anxiety, fatigue, headaches, backaches and insomnia. 

 Crow Pose - This fun, beginner arm balance is really a total body pose, especially the core! It's also very good for opening the wrists and strengthening the arms and chest. I started doing this pose by keeping my toes on the floor or a block and eventually working to get one then both feet to float. Draw the belly button in firmly, this pose looks like all arms but it's SO much core!

Crow Pose - This fun, beginner arm balance is really a total body pose, especially the core! It's also very good for opening the wrists and strengthening the arms and chest. I started doing this pose by keeping my toes on the floor or a block and eventually working to get one then both feet to float. Draw the belly button in firmly, this pose looks like all arms but it's SO much core!

Do you plan to get more involved within the sport?

I would be stoked to be more involved with it! Dirt bikes are such a huge part of our world and yoga has offered me so many amazing and fun opportunities both personally and professionally. Our hope is to "keep an iron in the fire" somehow and see where it takes us. I would love to see myself offering yoga lessons to racers, mechanics, race wives/girlfriends and their kiddos. I think we could have our own little ''yoga party in the pits'' and that would rock my world!  

Be sure to check out all of the cool things that Nicole is up to in the Yoga and Motocross/Supercross world by following her on social media and checking out her website.  For more informative and unique stories stay tuned to The Collective Experience.

Instagram - Nicolie148 and TriggrRacing

Website - haywardfitfans.webs.com

TCE SX Fan Experience gets you connected in the industry

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Getting into the industry of your dreams can seem like a journey that not only takes a lifetime, but can also be riddled with obstacles that seem almost insurmountable.  The vision that we have for ourselves in these goal worthy roles can get muddled and blurred after each small set back or step in the wrong direction. This is something that we all deal with and can easily relate to.  So  then how do we go about making our dreams a reality? How do we take the necessary steps to land our dream roles?  Where can we start?  These lingering questions paired with an immense passion for the SX industry sparked the creation of The Collective Experience and the TCE SX Fan Experience.  

The goal of this program is to give fans a completely immersive experience unlike anything offered in the industry.  This program gives participants a true behind the scenes look at what working for a pro team is all about.  It allows the everyday fan to get some very detailed insights into the industry and helps them to make some invaluable connections within the Supercross racing world. It also helps them to get a head start on a possible career within the industry. Many participants in the program have made life long memories along and connections that have landed then with opportunities that they once thought out of reach.  

 Robbie got some incredible hands on experience and got to learn from industry experts on a list of topics from bike set-up to program management.

Robbie got some incredible hands on experience and got to learn from industry experts on a list of topics from bike set-up to program management.

Superiors fan Robbie Good got a chance to shadow Supercross Pro AJ Catanzaro at the 2017 Metlife Supercross race as well as Pro Rookie Jon Ames the 2017 Budds Creek Pro MX National.  Robbie jumped into the program head first and fulfilled a lifelong dream of connecting with pros and more.  Robbie gave us a bit of insight into his experience with TCE....

"Since the time I can remember, I’ve been around dirt bikes.  When I was 4 years old my parents bought my brother and I a Kawasaki KDX50 and from there on my love for 2 wheels has never left.  Growing up I always felt the calling to join the military and when I was of age to serve my country I tried to enlist.  Unfortunately, due to health issues in my past it made me ineligible to join so from there on I was left searching for what “my thing” would be and what my future would look like.  Well, I figured my love for the Moto industry and riding has always been there so I started looking at opportunities within the industry.  To my amazement this past Spring I won a giveaway to shadow AJ Catanzaro at the Metlife Stadium Supercross race thanks to The Collective Experience.  When I was first introduced to AJ and his Team I felt comfortable right away.  It was like I was a part of them immediately.  When Jeremiah, AJ's mechanic, had me help him out I was able to learn the little things that he does to prep AJ’s bike and make sure all his sponsors are cleanly represented on the bike. I learned proper vehicle prep and much, much more about the bikes themselves.  I also got to learn from Rob Clingan, AJ's team manager, about analyzing where AJ is looking good or bad on the track and how to go about fixing those issues.  From all of the things that I learned on that day I feel that it translated over to my personal riding development.  This experience helped me to win my first College Boy 2 championship this past season.  I just applied a lot of the same principles to my program that AJ and his team implemented in theirs".

 AJ Catanzaro and his team are always extremely hospitable and love bringing new fans into their work environment to teach and inspire.

AJ Catanzaro and his team are always extremely hospitable and love bringing new fans into their work environment to teach and inspire.

"Because of all of the things that I learned at the Metlife Supercross race I decided to do the TCE Fan Experience program again, but this time for the 2017 Pro Outdoor Motocross National Series at Budds Creek Maryland. For this race I was partnered with Savij Racing rider Jon Jon Ames.  Once again I felt right at home with this team.  I got a very similar feeling with this staff as I did with AJ Catanzaro's team earlier in the year.  I got to learn from and be around industry renowned engine builder Chad Sanner and Team manager Broc Schemlyun.  Throughout the entire day I made a ton of connections in the industry with people like Jeff Jetton from 3N1MX and the guys from Panic Rev ministries.  I also got to have some good conversations with Factory riders Shane Mcelrath, Josh Mosiman, Zach Osbourne and many others. Both of these experiences were not only a dream come true, but were something that sparked my love for this sport even more!"

"Since my TCE Fan Experiences I have been pushing myself week in and week out training on and off the bike.  Because of the connections that I made through TCE I have recently been able to do some training with AJ Catanzaro and Pro Rookie Tyler Stepek at AJ’s track at Tomahawk MX.  I have also been getting ready for a new role where I will be working with a Pro rider in the Pro Motocross National series later in 2018.  I have learned a lot of skills, tips, and tricks around working with sponsors in the industry that help me keep going through the season with a solid gear setup and bike. I’ve also learned how to manage a program/routine myself on race day. By participating in this program I have learned more than I imagined I would and it’s been a very beneficial and fun time.  I know without a doubt that I will be signing up for one again in the 2018 season."

 Robbie also got to shadow Jon Ames and the Savij race team for a look inside of a different race team's program and to help make some added connections.. 

Robbie also got to shadow Jon Ames and the Savij race team for a look inside of a different race team's program and to help make some added connections.. 

For your chance to experience the same opportunities that Robbie did, be sure to sign up for the TCE SX Fan Experience and shadow your favorite pro rider at a Supercross race of your choice.  Get inside the action and get an experience unlike anything you imagined.

Introducing the 2018 TCE SX Internship Program

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We are extremely excited to offer fans from all over the country the amazing opportunity to be an intern for a pro rider on the 2018 Monster Energy Supercross race series.  Applicants will be entered into a national pool to see who gets the coveted internship role with privateer racing hero AJ Catanzaro and his race team.  The position will give the intern weekly access to the team and rider at each of the east coast rounds of the 2018 Supercross series.  This opportunity will enable the intern to be a full member of the team with responsibilities including scheduling, rider operation prep, social media, hands on support and more.  Working with a professional team will yield amazing connections within the SX industry and will offer an experience of a lifetime.  Never before has an opportunity of this magnitude been offered to fans at this level and we are pleased to give someone a head start into the industry that is a huge part of so many lives.  

AJ Catanzaro and his team plan to take you, the intern, under their wing and show you the ropes.  This gives you the chance to learn from industry experts and professionals on a wide range on topics.  Whether you want to be a pro mechanic, trainer, team manager or even a pro racer, this internship program is a great way to get fully immersed into the racing world.  To apply click here and access the application form and admission fee.  The admission fee will go toward helping to support the hard working privateers and teams of our sport.  Email the form with your signature to contact@thecollectivexp.com.  Don't be afraid to get creative and be sure to follow @thecollectiveex, share our post about the 2018 TCE SX Internship Program, and tag all your  buddies who would love this opportunity. Feel free to include a resume or any other submission that you feel would increase your chances of being picked.  For questions please feel free to contact us through our contact link.  Best of luck!

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Help out a local privateer!

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Privateer rider Deven Sorensen has re-joined the TCE SX Fan Experience program for 2018 and wants to give a lucky fan the chance to work with a pro rider.  Deven is looking for a race fan to help him during the week with his day to day operations and training.  This New England rider has  been putting in serious effort for his personal program and hopes to have some breakout rides on the east coast rounds of the 2018 Monster Energy Supercross series.  Deven will be stationed out of Club MX in Chesterfield, South Carolina along with several other talented pros.  This is a great chance for anyone who is looking to gain some valuable hands on experience with a pro rider.  Duties may include filming, running a pit board and taking lap times, working on riding drills, and other various hands on support tasks.  To enter for a chance to be selected make sure that you are following The Collective Experience and Deven himself on Instagram and Facebook. Also, be sure to follow FXR Racing and share the posts.  A winner will be selected by Deven in the coming week.

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How to get noticed in 7 easy steps...

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Have you ever wanted to be a stand out rider?  Of course we all crave the feeling of being the fastest rider at the track, but what about someone who stands out and gets the attention regardless if they win out right or not.  How about someone who gets the attention of the sponsors and race shops?  Sounds interesting right?! Well we're here to help!  All too often we run across individuals and racing families who are looking to stand out and hopefully attract some sponsors to help with the sometimes dauntingly high cost of racing.  We wanted to address some simple yet beneficial things that anyone at any level could implement and put to work to make the difference in their programs.  All of these things don't cost anything to you except some time, strategy, and elbow grease!  Let's dig into how you can get noticed and get the support you need.

Step 1) Be social!

One of the biggest things that we hear from people is " We don't bother with social media, we aren't tweens".  This is understandable, however it won't get you to where you want to go.  Our being social tip plays two fold: Being social online and being social at the races, but we'll cover the latter a bit down the road.  Social media platforms like Instagram and Facebook are modern marvels that far surpass anything a cable network of yesteryear would have been capable of.  The sheer impact and outreach of these two platforms alone can rocket just about anyone to multi-million dollar stardom.  You can see the evidence of that every day.  To let this ultra-powerful tool go to waste is a huge loss and something budget conscious racers shouldn't do.  If you haven't already (and we know there's a few of you out there) make sure that you create your own Instagram and Facebook pages, two of the most popular platforms.  These help to tell your own personal story and to help "brand" or market yourself.  This can really be a great tool for anyone who has a unique persona or charismatic personality as it helps to highlight this and set you apart from the herd.  The cool part is that we all have a unique voice and point of view no matter how "normal" or mundane we think we are.  An added bonus is that you get to post pictures of yourself getting steezy on your dirt scoot- always guaranteed to put a smile on your face!  

Owning a social media page also gives sponsors a place to learn more about you from a far and you can also use it to interact with the hundreds of millions of people around the world! It's pretty easy to find and DM a brand rep of a new gear company or a sales person from a parts manufacturer to strike up a conversation with.  This builds a relationship that could one day turn into a sponsorship. Using your social media page to tag or use trending hashtags can propel your outreach exponentially and put you in the face of some pretty influential people across multiple industries.  With these platforms also comes  the ability to create your own live videos, tell pictured stories, and stay connected with anyone at any time.  These can truly be your marketing magic wands.  For more information about how to properly use these platforms to maximize your outreach check out a few of the hundreds of thousands of videos on YouTube that are all about this topic.

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 Pro riders use their social media platforms to showcase themselves and to promote their sponsors.  It's very easy to see how a riders popularity, level of support, and social media presence all correlate.  

Pro riders use their social media platforms to showcase themselves and to promote their sponsors.  It's very easy to see how a riders popularity, level of support, and social media presence all correlate.  

Step 2) Results matter!

This one goes without saying.  Results always get the job done.  It only makes sense, right? After all, our attention is only on the top 3 at any race we go to.  This rings true for every Pro Supercross event all the way down to the local 85cc beginner classes.  We as a collective society focus on the winners, and brands know this.  People and reps who want riders and racers to represent their brand want those individuals who have the most attention on them.  Typically, that includes those who are in the top tier of their classes.  If you want to get the attention of brands and have something to put some weight and credibility behind your name then results are the key.  This means doubling down on your training and development as a racer to ensure that you hang at the top of your class.  We recommend signing up for as many race schools as you can to get hands on lessons.  You can never practice the fundamentals too much and learning under the watchful eye of a professional is always a plus.  Can't afford MX schools?  Try to see if you can work with the local fast guy at your track.  Often times these guys are more than happy to help a fellow rider out and all it usually costs is a beer at the end of the day.  Once you get your results where they need to be make sure that you are compiling them into a very organized and informative racer resume.  Many brands and companies use these to validate all prospective applicants.

 Many companies look for good results and top finishes.  A good finish at a major amateur national could set you up for a long road of support and opportunities.

Many companies look for good results and top finishes.  A good finish at a major amateur national could set you up for a long road of support and opportunities.

Step 3) Make connections!

Along with being more social online, you want to make sure that you are social in person.  Meeting new people and getting your name out there is more important than you would think.  A motto to live by is "You are only one handshake or hello away from your next greatest opportunity". You never know where relationships or interactions can lead.  It's always a great practice to be very outgoing and helpful to as many people as possible at the races.  People really notice and begin to associate you as a kind/worthwhile person and this can go a long way, especially with sponsors.  Think about it. If that one person you met at the track all of a sudden gets a gig working for a major MX brand and is looking for people to help out in your area, who do you think they are going to go for? The person who he or she doesn't know who randomly emailed them about getting sponsored or you, the one person who she/he became friends with after you striked up a conversation about how Ken Roczen's arm looked like corned beef hash after his crash at A2?.... Get the point? These stories happen everyday at almost every local track or race.  Being social, kind, and open to making friendships goes a long way in this industry.  It's not about who you know, it's all about who knows YOU.

As you can see, navigating and getting the most out of the MX and SX industry is all about the connections that you make.  If you ask a majority of the mechanics on the line at a Pro race, they would all say that they got into their roles from the relationships and connections that they made.  You can never know too many people and it always pays to have a lot of people in your corner.  Being at the forefront of people's mind when they are giving out opportunities that directly align with what you want is the name of the game.  Make sure you are taking every opportunity to make valuable connections at the track, at the local shops, online, at the races, in the Pro pits, and even connecting with the annoying race announcer guys at the local weekend races....

 Always make sure that you are making connections and talking with riders and others in the industry.  These types of relationships can yield incredible opportunities for both parties and set you up for success.

Always make sure that you are making connections and talking with riders and others in the industry.  These types of relationships can yield incredible opportunities for both parties and set you up for success.

Step 4) Be part of the action -join clubs, groups, and race classes

One of the best ways to get noticed is joining a riding club or organization that has a big outreach or platform.  Racing in big area competitions and with clubs that have a big social media following or video coverage can have a huge impact on you getting noticed.  Some races and clubs can generate hundreds of thousands of followers and video coverage of this magnitude can reach even more.  Getting your face or shots of you riding in these can propel you to that next step.  There have been a lot of racers who leaped frogged in popularity thanks to being featured in a video from a big race or from being tagged on social media by one of the race organizations with a large following.  This also helps out even more if you already have sponsors that you wish to highlight.  Getting your sponsors seen on a national scale solidifies your value as a sponsored rider and motivates them to work with you on upcoming seasons or projects...it's a win for them and a win for you!

 Classes and camps are a great way to learn, make connections, and stand out.  They can help to shape your racing skills and its a great opportunity to learn about the industry from pro riders up close.

Classes and camps are a great way to learn, make connections, and stand out.  They can help to shape your racing skills and its a great opportunity to learn about the industry from pro riders up close.

5) Get to know your local reps and sponsors

This ties directly into being social and putting yourself out there.  Often times people don't think to talk to their local reps of MX companies that they like or buy products from.  These are great relationships to have and are often times the easiest and most sure fire way to get noticed and supported.  There are a lot of MX companies all over that have regional reps that travel to races, shops, and other events.  Many times they are on the search for new vendors or shops to sell to and even new talent to represent the brand.  Why not have that person be you?! Find out who your local reps are and build a relationship.  A few of us have done this and it's led to lasting relationships with opportunities to become sponsored, test new products and bikes, and even ride with some of our favorite pro riders!  Also, don't be afraid to hit up local businesses in your area like hardware stores, auto centers, or even restaurants. After all, who wouldn't want to be associated with a Motocross racer?!  Trust us, it works!

 Reaching out to reps and sponsors can go very far and help keep you on the track each weekend.  This sport can be very costly, but the right level of support and help can ensure your season won't get cut short.

Reaching out to reps and sponsors can go very far and help keep you on the track each weekend.  This sport can be very costly, but the right level of support and help can ensure your season won't get cut short.

6) Learn from others

One of the best ways to learn or master anything is to get a good teacher or to use someone as a great example.  We all do this when we buy "How to videos" from our favorite riders.  We can apply this directly to getting noticed and supported.  Try to talk to or follow the example of some other riders who have the level of support and attention that you aspire to have.  What are some of the tools they are using to put themselves out there?  How are their results? How did they get their support? Don't be afraid to ask them and see what advice the have.  It's always a great idea to check out their social media presence and how they interact with everyone.

 It never hurts to keep an eye out for what the faster and more heavily supported riders are doing to get to the next level.  It's always good to push yourself and try new ways to up your game!

It never hurts to keep an eye out for what the faster and more heavily supported riders are doing to get to the next level.  It's always good to push yourself and try new ways to up your game!

7) Keep your set up clean!

This is another big one to make note of!  Keeping your bike, gear, and overall set up clean and professional looking really makes you stand out.  Think back to when you were at the track and a super clean and pro looking bike rolled up to the track.  What was your first thought? $20 says it was, "Wow that person must be good!" We all think it.  Really cleaning and getting your bike looking like a pro's bike will attract a lot of attention and shows sponsors that you take pride in your bike.  Brands want to make sure that their stickers and logo are shown in the best way possible.  This is the reason why so many pro mechanics spend so much time keeping the pro bikes looking clean and polished.  Spend a little extra time scrubbing your ride and making sure that the scuff marks and all of the dirt is off the bike.  Also, it's good to go over the bike with some polish or tire shine to really make it pop.  Check out one of our previous articles on keeping your bike Pro level clean.

This also extends to your gear set up.  Nothing looks worse than showing up with gear already mud splattered and helmets with broken visors for example.  Make sure that your gear is cleaned after each ride and that nothing is missing or broken.  Everything should be clean and as pro like as possible.  This doesn't mean that you need the latest and greatest gear, but making sure it's devoid of tears, stains, and any other damage is the goal.  Making sure that your set up is as #lit as possible without breaking the bank is very do-able for racers on a budget.  

 There's nothing that stands out better than a fresh looking bike.  Sponsors greatly appreciate riders and teams that represent their brand well by keeping everything looking ultra professional.

There's nothing that stands out better than a fresh looking bike.  Sponsors greatly appreciate riders and teams that represent their brand well by keeping everything looking ultra professional.

What do you think about these tips?  How can you implement these to make the most out of your racing? Try to apply these tactics and tips and work on getting the attention and help that you need.  Feel free to add in your own personal flare and tricks and feel free to share them with those round you.  Be sure to check out our upcoming articles on more industry tips, interviews, and contests.

Photo credits (IG):

@mannyfresh_860

@ddrakes175

@ajcatanzaro

@cadeclason

@h_miller48

@dlb21racing

@lauracristineh

The inside scoop on Pro Sponsorship

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One of the many great things about our sport is the incredible level of support that is all around us.  If you are anything like us then you marvel at all of the highly supported and ultra-trick factory bikes of the top riders.  Brands like Toyota, Red Bull, Alpinestars, Monster, and Microsoft have all had representation in the sport with both top level factory teams and smaller support efforts.  As any fan of the sport can attest, it's encouraging to see such well-known brands get behind the relatively small industries of Motocross and Supercross.  When it comes to support, it is very obvious to see why the top riders and teams have such big sponsors behind them.  They have the attention of the fans at the races, they are always on the podium, and riders everywhere want the same parts and gear as the pros in their very own garages.  But have you ever wondered why some riders get sponsored while others don't?  Have you been curious about why one rider can be doing very well, but can't seem to lock down the same level of sponsorship as the guys he or she is beating?  Well, it turns out there are a number of reasons why this happens.  We were curious to find out more about what the whole "sponsorship world" boils down to and how we could help our readers and fans apply some general tips and tricks to get more support.  

 Andy White has worked with some of the most famous and highly talented privateers and satellite supported riders around.  As FXR brand manager he is front and center for rider support and sponsorship negotiations.  His experience allows him to elevate the FXR brand and help riders all the same time.

Andy White has worked with some of the most famous and highly talented privateers and satellite supported riders around.  As FXR brand manager he is front and center for rider support and sponsorship negotiations.  His experience allows him to elevate the FXR brand and help riders all the same time.

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During our search for answers we reached out to two well known industry insiders to get the inside scoop.  First was FXR Racing brand manager and all around moto-insider Andy White.  Andy has experience as a rider/racer along with several other roles, including team manager of a full race team some years back.  In his 20 plus year run in the industry Andy has amassed quite the knowledge base.  His latest role with FXR gives him an expert point of view on what goes into sponsoring a rider.  Our second expert source came from current Rockwell Racing's team manager and moto die-hard Chris Elliott.  Chris has also held several high profile positions within the sport and has extensive knowledge on the racing sponsorship topic.  Thanks to the insight from these industry experts, and others within the sport, we got the low-down on what the pro sponsorship scene consists of...

 Chris Elliott manages a major racing outfit and is in charge of finding talent to bring to the team. (credit: Krystyn Slack)  

Chris Elliott manages a major racing outfit and is in charge of finding talent to bring to the team. (credit: Krystyn Slack)  

 Chris brings years of experience in the industry to the team and builds special relationships with the riders. He knows exactly what makes a rider worth sponsoring. (credit:Krystyn Slack)

Chris brings years of experience in the industry to the team and builds special relationships with the riders. He knows exactly what makes a rider worth sponsoring. (credit:Krystyn Slack)

What is your role within the industry?

(A.W.) Well I actually wear a few hats right now as FXR is new to the off road industry. I am the Brand manager/ rider rep/ inventory control and much more

(C.E.) I have done a little bit of everything in this industry…but right now, I am the Race Team Manager for the ROCKWELL RACING Nuclear Blast Records FXR team.

How did you get into this role?

(A.W.) I just finished up working for KTM Canada and I was talking to Aaron Weibe from FXR about his racing. Next thing you know I was consulting for FXR in 2015, then it turned in to a full time position.

(C.E.) That’s a long story and unlikely story. I am originally from Kaministiquia, Ontario Canada and my first “break” in the industry was as a FMX writer for Direct Motocross in Canada…from there I started my own site called FMXnews.com; shortly after launching FMXnews.com, I was luckily enough to get on with ESPN as a writer. It was a pretty unlikely scenario from me, especially if you asked me ten years ago if I’d ever be a writer, let alone contribute written content to ESPN. After my time at ESPN, I got into digital marketing with a company called Media Axe. In my time at Media Axe, I ran accounts in Indy Car, SST, of course moto and even a Super Bowl campaign. I ended up with a KTM team for what was supposed to be just a Saturdays only contract and that is where I met Clarky (Ryan Clark). After 2016, he and I decide to run our own program, found the perfect partners over at Rockwell Watches and here we are.

 Sponsorship can make or break a rider and team.  Support at any level is a much needed benefit that keeps riders racing and competition week in and week out.  At the privateer level a good supportive group and sponsor can elevate you to the next level.

Sponsorship can make or break a rider and team.  Support at any level is a much needed benefit that keeps riders racing and competition week in and week out.  At the privateer level a good supportive group and sponsor can elevate you to the next level.

What was your introduction to the sport?

(A.W.) I rode a mini bike when I was 8 years old and I was hooked! I then started racing at the age of 16. I worked my way up to the pro class and now I am still riding and race the occasional vet race.

(C.E.) I like most kids just had cool Dad who used to ride and it was kind of our thing. It definitely helped to have rad parents who were willing to spend a ton of money to go racing and have fun at the track as a family. My uncle had used to race at a pretty decent level when he was younger so he was involved a fair bit. I was NOT very fast, but we had fun.

Why do companies sponsor riders?

(A.W.) They sponsor riders to help brand the company.  This brings attention to the company and translates in to sales from consumers/customers.

(C.E.) That’s a tricky one, cause I am on the other side of that coin. But I would say traditionally it comes down to marketing, whether you are paying a rider or just giving them product at a discount; you would look at the rider as an investment in your brand. In most cases, your hope would be there is a return on that relationship, which could be something a little as brand recognition at local tracks, to the best case scenario in that a rider you sponsored would help influence consumers to purchase your product giving you that return on the initial investment of sponsoring that rider(s).

 Sponsors love when their athletes interact with fans and the media.  The more likable and open a rider is, the more marketable and value added the rider is.  Aj Catanzaro was a perfect example of great customer interaction at the 2017 Atlanta SX rounds.  Acts like these led to him being signed with FXR Racing and the Rockwell Race team for 2018.

Sponsors love when their athletes interact with fans and the media.  The more likable and open a rider is, the more marketable and value added the rider is.  Aj Catanzaro was a perfect example of great customer interaction at the 2017 Atlanta SX rounds.  Acts like these led to him being signed with FXR Racing and the Rockwell Race team for 2018.

What are some of the things that sponsors look for in a rider?

(A.W.)  Good question, Results, Social media , well liked . As for the different types of sponsorship levels there are discounted programs all the way up to fully paid athletes in Pro Motocross and Supercross.

(C.E.) If you are talking OEMs and million dollar contracts, usually the decisions start and stop with results. But for me handling a non-factory supported team, my big thing is marketability. And in that I mean how the person handles themselves both on and off the track, and at times the most important one is on their social medias. The easiest way to track numbers/influence is through social media analytics and brands can/have/will use this when negotiating with riders based on what they feel their influence on fans (consumers) may be…

What are some common misconceptions from riders about sponsorship?

(A.W.) Some think they deserve way more than we offer them. They forget we talk to the other companies and we usually know what the support levels are out there.

(C.E.) Again, OEMS want results. But brands dealing with amateurs and smaller teams team may take a different approach. Like I said for me, I don’t get to concerned with how many 16th place finishes a rider had last year and not because that isn’t extremely respectable. It’s because that usually doesn’t move the needle for brands, I challenge someone on the spot to tell me who finished 7th in Dallas last year. You CAN’T, and you probably couldn’t tell me third place either…maybe you could recall who won, but that is it. If you are not winning, brands want activation both at events and digitally. We want kids that are going to help market and push our sponsors (who are our business partners) while giving it their all on the track every night.

 Professional sponsorship and support gives some riders the best equipment along with financial support to cover the immense costs of racing.

Professional sponsorship and support gives some riders the best equipment along with financial support to cover the immense costs of racing.

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How have you seen the sponsor/rider relationship change in recent years?

(A.W.) Its been pretty consistent , however I do see riders jumping from company to company with no real loyalty in recent years.

(C.E.) The digital platform, more specifically social media has allowed riders to take their careers into their own hands. With the ability to have a presence almost instantly online, riders are able to be their own publicist 24/7 and if done properly, their worth can grow.

How have social media outlets influenced the sponsorship process/consideration?

(A.W.) They help, its easy for us to see if the rider is social or not. We are looking for riders that post nice pictures and thank their sponsors.  Gratitude and holding up their end of the deal is crucial.

(C.E.) Obviously you should treat your social platform like your own marketing firm and your clients are your sponsors. You constantly want to engage your sponsors in a positive way with your followers as much as you can. I would also recommend keep it clean when posting “non-moto’ content. Everyone is entitled to own beliefs, but engaging in any religious, political, or vulgar content creation may hurt your bid for sponsorship depending on brand.

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 Social media interaction is increasingly becoming one of the most important factors that sponsors looks at when it comes to signing a rider.  

Social media interaction is increasingly becoming one of the most important factors that sponsors looks at when it comes to signing a rider.  

What can the average racer at any level do to increase their chances of getting sponsored?

(A.W.) Good results, post on social media, keep your set up clean. Network in the industry and be friendly. The industry is small so its easy for reps like me to call another industry person and get feed back on a rider.

(C.E.) Just be the best person you can be. Real recognizes real and as long as you are riding well, have a clean look, and put in the effort to promote your sponsors. Brands will reward you!

 Which riders do you see needing more support or sponsorship?  What are some attributes that they need to get them to the next level?

Which riders do you see needing more support or sponsorship?  What are some attributes that they need to get them to the next level?

Andy and Chris both know sponsorships and how they benefit both the rider and company.  In a sport like Motocross and Supercross sponsorship is a must for so many.  They enable the industry to thrive and take our racing heroes to the next level.  Stay tuned for a step by step guide to how YOU can apply these guidelines and insights to get sponsored and get to your racing goals. 

Chris Elliott - Rockwell Racing team

Andy White - FXR Racing

 

 

 

2018 TCE SX Fan Experience NOW OPEN for sign ups!

As the 2018 race season nears fans all over the world are itching for the start of yet another action packed season.  We are excited to announce the return of the program for 2018 and that sign-ups for our first round of Tier 1 riders are now open to the general public.  More riders will be announced in the coming weeks.  TCE has also opened up the program for the entire race season per popular request from our great fan base.  Race enthusiasts now have the opportunity to shadow and go behind the scenes with their favorite privateer riders at every round of the 2018 Monster Energy Supercross race season.  This is a great adjustment that has both riders and fans grinning from ear to ear.  For more information about the program be sure to head over the TCE SX Fan Experience page and sign up.  Spots are limited so act now!

2018 Monster Energy Supercross race series schedule:

Round 1 Saturday, January 6, 2018 Anaheim, CA Angel Stadium

Round 2 Saturday, January 13, 2018 Houston, TX NRG Stadium

Round 3 Saturday, January 20, 2018 Anaheim, CA Angel Stadium

Round 4 Saturday, January 27, 2018 Glendale, AZ U. of Phoenix Stadium

Round 5 Saturday, February 3, 2018 Oakland, CA Oakland Alameda Coliseum

Round 6 Saturday, February 10, 2018 San Diego, CA Petco Park

Round 7 Saturday, February 17, 2018 Arlington, TX AT&T Stadium

Round 8 Saturday, February 24, 2018 Tampa, FL Raymond James Stadium 

Round 9 Saturday, March 3, 2018 Atlanta, GA Mercedes-Benz Stadium

Round 10 Saturday, March 10, 2018 Daytona, FL Daytona Intl. Speedway

Round 11 Saturday, March 17, 2018 St. Louis, MO Dome at America's Center

Round 12 Saturday, March 24, 2018 Indianapolis, IN Lucas Oil Stadium

Round 13 Saturday, April 7, 2018 Seattle, WA Centurylink Field

Round 14 Saturday, April 14, 2018 Minneapolis, MN U.S. Bank Stadium

Round 15 Saturday, April 21, 2018 Foxborough, MA Gillette Stadium

Round 16 Saturday, April 28, 2018 Salt Lake City, UT Rice-Eccles Stadium

Round 17 Saturday, May 5, 2018 Las Vegas, NV Sam Boyd Stadium

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TCE Dream Chasers with Tayler Kaplan

 

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One of the great things about the Moto industry is that there are so many different facets and avenues to pursue within this quickly expanding industry.  From racer to mechanic to promoter to sponsor, there are tons of different paths to travel down.  One of the most sought after positions within the industry is the role of brand ambassador or model for some of the top brands in racing.  The lucky few in these roles are adored by fans and enjoy the spotlight from magazines, websites, and even live shows.  One lucky new comer to the scene is Connecticut's own Tayler Kaplan.  Tayler has been apart of the racing world her whole life and somewhat recently embarked on a journey to become one of the leading brand embassadors in Supercross and Motocross.  We took some time to talk to Tayler about her racing past, the industry, and what it was like being featured by Transworld Motocross.

Hey Tayler, so for those out there that maybe unfamiliar with you tell everyone where you're from and little bit about yourself.

Hi everyone, and thanks again to TCE for having me! I’m Tayler and I’m 20 years old, New England born and raised. I have been a promotional model for about 3 years now and I’ve established myself a niche in the world of motorsports. Growing up, I attended just about every major motocross event on the East Coast from Canada to Florida so it’s such an incredible feeling getting to be hands-on and involved in the sport. I attended my first Supercross when I was 3 months old at Daytona in 1997 which planted the seed for a lifelong love of all things motocross. My dad tossed me on a PW50 with training wheels as soon as I could walk, but as far as riding goes these days I pretty much stick to ripping pitbikes under the lights in our yard! To follow my journey you can find me on Instagram @TheTaylerKaplan or on Facebook as Tayler Kaplan.

How did you and your family get into the sport of Motocross?

Oh man, it goes way back. I come from a long line of motocross enthusiasts. My Dad got his first bike as a Christmas gift in the early 70’s and his whole life has essentially revolved around the sport since then. He even rode through the hallways of his high school on a dare once- he’s a very balls-to-the-wall type of guy. For around 30 years he raced the New England circuit with clubs like NESC, NEMX, and NEMA (RIP), which meant that we were always traveling. Eventually, my brother and sister started racing too so it was a total family affair. My sister won a championship against a class of all boys once when she was 6 which was badass. As for me, I played pit chick and loved it ironically. I worked with some of the tracks running the 30 Second Board and flagging while my family raced. Every family vacation revolved around some sort of motorcycle event, most often Daytona. I guess the point that I’m getting at is that I didn’t really have much of a choice, at the beginning at least. But even when my dad couldn’t make it, I carried on the tradition myself. Last year I drove up to the Unadilla national in my Corolla and had full intentions of sleeping in it until a very good friend who was racing that weekend let me hang out with them.

 Tayler's family has an extensive racing history in New England.  Racing is in Tayler's blood and her connection to the industry has helped propel her into national recognition.  Above Tayler and her dad Ken pose aboard some fresh Suzukis.

Tayler's family has an extensive racing history in New England.  Racing is in Tayler's blood and her connection to the industry has helped propel her into national recognition.  Above Tayler and her dad Ken pose aboard some fresh Suzukis.

What led to you wanting to pursue a career in modeling/brand endorsing?

Being a young girl attending Supercross races, I always looked up the Monster Energy girls. In my mind they were a symbol of the perfect mix between beauty and badassery: something I knew I had to be a part of. On top of that, I was always tall, and when you’re tall you constantly get asked two questions: 1. Do you play basketball? Or 2. Well you must be a model then, right? Eventually I realized I had to at least give modeling a shot (I’m far from coordinated so ball sports were never an option), so at 12 years old I started working with my first modeling agency. High fashion modeling was always boring to me (and kind of ugly- oops, did I say that?), so I’ve always focused on the commercial and promotional side of the industry. It’s truly all I’ve ever wanted for as long as I can remember. I’m a huge marketing nut as well.  Right now I’m studying Digital Marketing with Duke University online so promotional modeling is the perfect crossroad since I get to market and promote different brands on site. My first promotional gig, however, was as a spokesmodel representing Progressive Motorcycle Insurance at Laconia Bike Week, which was a crazy experience. I knew this from my years attending Daytona Bike Week, but the biker community is so different from the moto community, especially from the aspect of a promotional model- the energy is just completely different. From there, I continued to market and brand myself and began to receive offers from different agencies and companies that wanted to work with me.

What's the most exciting aspect of this career in your opinion?

The most exciting aspect of this career path is the ability it gives you to travel and meet so many like-minded people. Representing Fly Racing at the Southwick National (my home track) was by far one of the most fun days of my life. I got to take photos and talk with hundreds and hundreds of moto fiends from all over the region. I also love the fact that there’s no limit as to where you can take this. There are endless opportunities in the modeling world and so many different ways to use your platform. As I grow my own platform, I plan to start spearheading a motorcycle safety outreach. In the past few years I have lost (and almost lost) way too many people from motorsports incidents. I really hope to bring some awareness to the general public and hopefully work towards developing new safety initiatives off-road as well. Look twice, you could save a life!

What has been the most challenging and also the most rewarding part of your journey?

By far, without a doubt, the biggest challenge I have faced as a promotional model is the fact that I live in Connecticut. There are very few opportunities in the industry out here. The only real major moto events are the Southwick and Unadilla nationals, Laconia Bike Week, and most recently Foxborough Supercross which are all held annually. I have plans to move to the west coast in the very near future so it won’t be too much of a problem any longer. I was actually booked for SEMA this week until the agency realized how expensive it would be to get me out there from the sticks of Connecticut! It’s incredibly frustrating that I can’t work on my craft as often as I’d like out here so I can’t possibly get out fast enough. It’s just a matter of getting all of my ducks in a row!

The most rewarding part of the journey has been the fact that I’m able to be immersed in such an incredible culture and represent the brands that I’ve been surrounded by and supporting my entire life. I know it sounds incredibly corny, but it truly does feel like home. Being surrounded by people who are just as passionate as I am is just an added bonus!

 Throughout her relatively short stint in the industry Tayler has managed to land some amazing opportunities that allow her to make strides towards her dream role.  

Throughout her relatively short stint in the industry Tayler has managed to land some amazing opportunities that allow her to make strides towards her dream role.  

What's something about this journey and career that most people don't know about? 

This is a tough one! Honestly, I think people underestimate just how much goes on behind the scenes. People laugh at how seriously I take Instagram, but as a model it is a huge business tool for me! Each and every photo I post is an opportunity to be approached by a new photographer, casting agent, or brand that I can collaborate with. Lately I’ve been aiming to shoot at least once per week- which means creating new concepts, putting together the right wardrobe, scouting a location, tracking down props, and finding hair and makeup help. Each and every step of the process is such a blast so I’m definitely lucky for that. I love that I have the ability to orchestrate every aspect of my work and the story my photos tell are all my own.

What are some key things that you have learned along the way?

This journey has taught me so many things about humanity in general. When your job is to put on a revealing outfit and take photos with fans, many of whom are intoxicated on some level, you hear some of the craziest things. At Southwick, a grown man literally got on his knees in front of me and bowed. I love everything about what I do, don’t get me wrong, but it teaches you a lot about interacting with different types of people. I have also learned how important it is to have a thick skin. This asset is absolutely VITAL to be successful in any capacity in the modeling world. The truth is, I’ve been told “no” FAR more times than I’ve been told “yes”. However, if I had stopped the first time I was told I should, I wouldn’t be where I am today, with the honor of being interviewed by TCE or having been featured in Transworld Motocross last week. And I’m just getting started!

What's one thing that you would change about the industry as a whole?

This problem isn’t just limited to the moto or modeling industry, but it is a bit of a challenge to be taken seriously as a woman. It just happens to be ten times more difficult in a male-dominated industry. I hope to be part of the force that changes that, however. I can be pretty, AND pretty smart, too. A woman shouldn’t have to be modest in order to be respected- It’s 2017!

How has your background in the sport helped you break into this role?

My background in the sport helped in that I didn’t really have to break into this role at all, I was basically born into it. Having the right network in the industry surrounding me is huge- people such as Paul Buckley, New England’s most well-connected man in motocross, have become an incredible resource for me. Even if it didn’t morph into a career for me, I would still feel blessed for all of the years I spent growing up involved in motocross.

We've seen you work with Billy of Surge Unlimited on some amazing projects, can you tell us what those were like?

Billy is absolutely incredible and I'm honored to have been able to partner with him on some cool projects. The New England moto scene is pretty tight knit and I always knew Billy through his association with JDay. When I found out he ventured out on his own and started his production company, I approached him with a concept that I wanted to submit to TWMX. I had him meet me in my Dad's abandoned mill complex on a 37 degree November night where we took the red bikini shots on the 500. I was FREEZING. As soon as he finished editing them I immediately submitted them to Transworld. Ironically, I never heard anything from them, until this past Monday night (literally almost a year later) where Don Maeda emailed me "Hey, sorry I never saw this. Can I still post them?" and I woke up the next morning to 200 new followers and about 50 friend requests. We were both pretty stoked to finally see our vision come to fruition and I'm so honored to have gotten national recognition from a magazine I've been reading for as long as I can remember. Last time I checked, my feature had over 800 shares in 48 hours which is pretty cool for some photos that are now a year old! I've also collaborated with Billy on some product shoots for his Surge Unlimited clothing line. That was fun too, besides the part where he made me walk through pricker bushes.

 TCE partner and media power house Surge Unlimited got some stellar shots of Tayler in her families incredible motorcycle museum located in historic Connecticut.  The shots came out great and landed Tayler in a feature on the Transworld Motocross website.

TCE partner and media power house Surge Unlimited got some stellar shots of Tayler in her families incredible motorcycle museum located in historic Connecticut.  The shots came out great and landed Tayler in a feature on the Transworld Motocross website.

Surge Unlimited has partnered with The Collective Experience on a few projects as well and the work is unparalleled, what do you think makes Billy stand out as a photographer/videographer?

 I’ve been lucky enough to work with a lot of very talented photographers, but what makes Billy stand out to me is his unique vision. He sets out to each and every shoot with a precise vision in mind and does not leave until he achieves it. We are both very creative-minded so we always end up with some insane images when we join forces.

What are some plans or goals that you have for the future?

I am a firm believer in the law of attraction so I'm going to speak this one into existence: Miss Supercross 2019! I know you’re listening, Feld! ;) As far as short term goals, the first order of business is definitely to get my ass out to the west coast so I can dive right into all the area has to offer. Speaking long-term, I do want to pursue modeling for as long as I possibly can, and start my own business along the way. I constantly have to be involved in exciting and creative endeavors or my mind goes crazy- there’s truly no telling what I’ll end up doing next, but it’s sure to be an adventure!

What keeps you motivated to keep going and pushing to make your dream a reality?

The biggest source of motivation for me is the fact that I’m not where I want to be. I always feel like I can do better or be better. There is so much left out there for me to accomplish, I’m just getting started! I’m still trying to have my voice heard and to be seen by some key players in the industry. Having a clear vision of what you want from your life is the most effective way to stay on track and crush your goals. I won’t stop until I get there.

 Always looking for new creative perspectives, Tayler isn't afraid to try new things and stand out with new concepts for shots.

Always looking for new creative perspectives, Tayler isn't afraid to try new things and stand out with new concepts for shots.

There are lots of girls and guys out there that are aspiring to do exactly what you are, what advice would you have for them?

The absolute biggest piece of advice that I can give any guy or girl that wants to pursue this industry is to harness the power of social media. So many people really don't seem to comprehend that they have one of the biggest tools to success in 2017 literally in the palm of their hands. You can connect to the entire world in seconds. I was featured in Transworld Motocross solely off of a Facebook message. Branding yourself is HUGE- create a voice for yourself online, distinguish your character, and work on your craft any chance you can get. Another piece of advice I always give to aspiring models is to stay strong and stay persistent. Keep a clear vision about what you want from your career and don't fold. I'm the type who will literally keep going until I'm told yes, which isn't always a good thing I suppose. But some people do appreciate tenacity! ;)

Lastly, thinking long term, what impact do you hope to have on the industry?

This is a man’s sport that I’m trying to create my own lane in and bring my creativity, entrepreneurial skillset and ambition to play. I want to be a positive representation of the culture that is motocross. Women riders are the fastest growing demographic in the industry and I hope to play a key role in encouraging more women to participate. At the end of the day, I guess all that I can say is time will tell! There are so many things that I want to get involved in- the possibilities are endless. Stay tuned!

Journeys like Tayler's remind us to keep pushing forward and chasing goals.  To keep up with Tayler be sure to follow her @thetaylerkaplan and check out her killer shots.  A special thanks to Surge Unlimited for the shots. For more inspirational stories and interviews with industry insiders be sure to stay tuned to The Collective Experience.