TCE SX Fan Experience gets you connected in the industry

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Getting into the industry of your dreams can seem like a journey that not only takes a lifetime, but can also be riddled with obstacles that seem almost insurmountable.  The vision that we have for ourselves in these goal worthy roles can get muddled and blurred after each small set back or step in the wrong direction. This is something that we all deal with and can easily relate to.  So  then how do we go about making our dreams a reality? How do we take the necessary steps to land our dream roles?  Where can we start?  These lingering questions paired with an immense passion for the SX industry sparked the creation of The Collective Experience and the TCE SX Fan Experience.  

The goal of this program is to give fans a completely immersive experience unlike anything offered in the industry.  This program gives participants a true behind the scenes look at what working for a pro team is all about.  It allows the everyday fan to get some very detailed insights into the industry and helps them to make some invaluable connections within the Supercross racing world. It also helps them to get a head start on a possible career within the industry. Many participants in the program have made life long memories along and connections that have landed then with opportunities that they once thought out of reach.  

Robbie got some incredible hands on experience and got to learn from industry experts on a list of topics from bike set-up to program management.

Robbie got some incredible hands on experience and got to learn from industry experts on a list of topics from bike set-up to program management.

Superiors fan Robbie Good got a chance to shadow Supercross Pro AJ Catanzaro at the 2017 Metlife Supercross race as well as Pro Rookie Jon Ames the 2017 Budds Creek Pro MX National.  Robbie jumped into the program head first and fulfilled a lifelong dream of connecting with pros and more.  Robbie gave us a bit of insight into his experience with TCE....

"Since the time I can remember, I’ve been around dirt bikes.  When I was 4 years old my parents bought my brother and I a Kawasaki KDX50 and from there on my love for 2 wheels has never left.  Growing up I always felt the calling to join the military and when I was of age to serve my country I tried to enlist.  Unfortunately, due to health issues in my past it made me ineligible to join so from there on I was left searching for what “my thing” would be and what my future would look like.  Well, I figured my love for the Moto industry and riding has always been there so I started looking at opportunities within the industry.  To my amazement this past Spring I won a giveaway to shadow AJ Catanzaro at the Metlife Stadium Supercross race thanks to The Collective Experience.  When I was first introduced to AJ and his Team I felt comfortable right away.  It was like I was a part of them immediately.  When Jeremiah, AJ's mechanic, had me help him out I was able to learn the little things that he does to prep AJ’s bike and make sure all his sponsors are cleanly represented on the bike. I learned proper vehicle prep and much, much more about the bikes themselves.  I also got to learn from Rob Clingan, AJ's team manager, about analyzing where AJ is looking good or bad on the track and how to go about fixing those issues.  From all of the things that I learned on that day I feel that it translated over to my personal riding development.  This experience helped me to win my first College Boy 2 championship this past season.  I just applied a lot of the same principles to my program that AJ and his team implemented in theirs".

AJ Catanzaro and his team are always extremely hospitable and love bringing new fans into their work environment to teach and inspire.

AJ Catanzaro and his team are always extremely hospitable and love bringing new fans into their work environment to teach and inspire.

"Because of all of the things that I learned at the Metlife Supercross race I decided to do the TCE Fan Experience program again, but this time for the 2017 Pro Outdoor Motocross National Series at Budds Creek Maryland. For this race I was partnered with Savij Racing rider Jon Jon Ames.  Once again I felt right at home with this team.  I got a very similar feeling with this staff as I did with AJ Catanzaro's team earlier in the year.  I got to learn from and be around industry renowned engine builder Chad Sanner and Team manager Broc Schemlyun.  Throughout the entire day I made a ton of connections in the industry with people like Jeff Jetton from 3N1MX and the guys from Panic Rev ministries.  I also got to have some good conversations with Factory riders Shane Mcelrath, Josh Mosiman, Zach Osbourne and many others. Both of these experiences were not only a dream come true, but were something that sparked my love for this sport even more!"

"Since my TCE Fan Experiences I have been pushing myself week in and week out training on and off the bike.  Because of the connections that I made through TCE I have recently been able to do some training with AJ Catanzaro and Pro Rookie Tyler Stepek at AJ’s track at Tomahawk MX.  I have also been getting ready for a new role where I will be working with a Pro rider in the Pro Motocross National series later in 2018.  I have learned a lot of skills, tips, and tricks around working with sponsors in the industry that help me keep going through the season with a solid gear setup and bike. I’ve also learned how to manage a program/routine myself on race day. By participating in this program I have learned more than I imagined I would and it’s been a very beneficial and fun time.  I know without a doubt that I will be signing up for one again in the 2018 season."

Robbie also got to shadow Jon Ames and the Savij race team for a look inside of a different race team's program and to help make some added connections.. 

Robbie also got to shadow Jon Ames and the Savij race team for a look inside of a different race team's program and to help make some added connections.. 

For your chance to experience the same opportunities that Robbie did, be sure to sign up for the TCE SX Fan Experience and shadow your favorite pro rider at a Supercross race of your choice.  Get inside the action and get an experience unlike anything you imagined.

Introducing the 2018 TCE SX Internship Program

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We are extremely excited to offer fans from all over the country the amazing opportunity to be an intern for a pro rider on the 2018 Monster Energy Supercross race series.  Applicants will be entered into a national pool to see who gets the coveted internship role with privateer racing hero AJ Catanzaro and his race team.  The position will give the intern weekly access to the team and rider at each of the east coast rounds of the 2018 Supercross series.  This opportunity will enable the intern to be a full member of the team with responsibilities including scheduling, rider operation prep, social media, hands on support and more.  Working with a professional team will yield amazing connections within the SX industry and will offer an experience of a lifetime.  Never before has an opportunity of this magnitude been offered to fans at this level and we are pleased to give someone a head start into the industry that is a huge part of so many lives.  

AJ Catanzaro and his team plan to take you, the intern, under their wing and show you the ropes.  This gives you the chance to learn from industry experts and professionals on a wide range on topics.  Whether you want to be a pro mechanic, trainer, team manager or even a pro racer, this internship program is a great way to get fully immersed into the racing world.  To apply click here and access the application form and admission fee.  The admission fee will go toward helping to support the hard working privateers and teams of our sport.  Email the form with your signature to contact@thecollectivexp.com.  Don't be afraid to get creative and be sure to follow @thecollectiveex, share our post about the 2018 TCE SX Internship Program, and tag all your  buddies who would love this opportunity. Feel free to include a resume or any other submission that you feel would increase your chances of being picked.  For questions please feel free to contact us through our contact link.  Best of luck!

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Help out a local privateer!

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Privateer rider Deven Sorensen has re-joined the TCE SX Fan Experience program for 2018 and wants to give a lucky fan the chance to work with a pro rider.  Deven is looking for a race fan to help him during the week with his day to day operations and training.  This New England rider has  been putting in serious effort for his personal program and hopes to have some breakout rides on the east coast rounds of the 2018 Monster Energy Supercross series.  Deven will be stationed out of Club MX in Chesterfield, South Carolina along with several other talented pros.  This is a great chance for anyone who is looking to gain some valuable hands on experience with a pro rider.  Duties may include filming, running a pit board and taking lap times, working on riding drills, and other various hands on support tasks.  To enter for a chance to be selected make sure that you are following The Collective Experience and Deven himself on Instagram and Facebook. Also, be sure to follow FXR Racing and share the posts.  A winner will be selected by Deven in the coming week.

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How to get noticed in 7 easy steps...

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Have you ever wanted to be a stand out rider?  Of course we all crave the feeling of being the fastest rider at the track, but what about someone who stands out and gets the attention regardless if they win out right or not.  How about someone who gets the attention of the sponsors and race shops?  Sounds interesting right?! Well we're here to help!  All too often we run across individuals and racing families who are looking to stand out and hopefully attract some sponsors to help with the sometimes dauntingly high cost of racing.  We wanted to address some simple yet beneficial things that anyone at any level could implement and put to work to make the difference in their programs.  All of these things don't cost anything to you except some time, strategy, and elbow grease!  Let's dig into how you can get noticed and get the support you need.

Step 1) Be social!

One of the biggest things that we hear from people is " We don't bother with social media, we aren't tweens".  This is understandable, however it won't get you to where you want to go.  Our being social tip plays two fold: Being social online and being social at the races, but we'll cover the latter a bit down the road.  Social media platforms like Instagram and Facebook are modern marvels that far surpass anything a cable network of yesteryear would have been capable of.  The sheer impact and outreach of these two platforms alone can rocket just about anyone to multi-million dollar stardom.  You can see the evidence of that every day.  To let this ultra-powerful tool go to waste is a huge loss and something budget conscious racers shouldn't do.  If you haven't already (and we know there's a few of you out there) make sure that you create your own Instagram and Facebook pages, two of the most popular platforms.  These help to tell your own personal story and to help "brand" or market yourself.  This can really be a great tool for anyone who has a unique persona or charismatic personality as it helps to highlight this and set you apart from the herd.  The cool part is that we all have a unique voice and point of view no matter how "normal" or mundane we think we are.  An added bonus is that you get to post pictures of yourself getting steezy on your dirt scoot- always guaranteed to put a smile on your face!  

Owning a social media page also gives sponsors a place to learn more about you from a far and you can also use it to interact with the hundreds of millions of people around the world! It's pretty easy to find and DM a brand rep of a new gear company or a sales person from a parts manufacturer to strike up a conversation with.  This builds a relationship that could one day turn into a sponsorship. Using your social media page to tag or use trending hashtags can propel your outreach exponentially and put you in the face of some pretty influential people across multiple industries.  With these platforms also comes  the ability to create your own live videos, tell pictured stories, and stay connected with anyone at any time.  These can truly be your marketing magic wands.  For more information about how to properly use these platforms to maximize your outreach check out a few of the hundreds of thousands of videos on YouTube that are all about this topic.

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Pro riders use their social media platforms to showcase themselves and to promote their sponsors.  It's very easy to see how a riders popularity, level of support, and social media presence all correlate.  

Pro riders use their social media platforms to showcase themselves and to promote their sponsors.  It's very easy to see how a riders popularity, level of support, and social media presence all correlate.  

Step 2) Results matter!

This one goes without saying.  Results always get the job done.  It only makes sense, right? After all, our attention is only on the top 3 at any race we go to.  This rings true for every Pro Supercross event all the way down to the local 85cc beginner classes.  We as a collective society focus on the winners, and brands know this.  People and reps who want riders and racers to represent their brand want those individuals who have the most attention on them.  Typically, that includes those who are in the top tier of their classes.  If you want to get the attention of brands and have something to put some weight and credibility behind your name then results are the key.  This means doubling down on your training and development as a racer to ensure that you hang at the top of your class.  We recommend signing up for as many race schools as you can to get hands on lessons.  You can never practice the fundamentals too much and learning under the watchful eye of a professional is always a plus.  Can't afford MX schools?  Try to see if you can work with the local fast guy at your track.  Often times these guys are more than happy to help a fellow rider out and all it usually costs is a beer at the end of the day.  Once you get your results where they need to be make sure that you are compiling them into a very organized and informative racer resume.  Many brands and companies use these to validate all prospective applicants.

Many companies look for good results and top finishes.  A good finish at a major amateur national could set you up for a long road of support and opportunities.

Many companies look for good results and top finishes.  A good finish at a major amateur national could set you up for a long road of support and opportunities.

Step 3) Make connections!

Along with being more social online, you want to make sure that you are social in person.  Meeting new people and getting your name out there is more important than you would think.  A motto to live by is "You are only one handshake or hello away from your next greatest opportunity". You never know where relationships or interactions can lead.  It's always a great practice to be very outgoing and helpful to as many people as possible at the races.  People really notice and begin to associate you as a kind/worthwhile person and this can go a long way, especially with sponsors.  Think about it. If that one person you met at the track all of a sudden gets a gig working for a major MX brand and is looking for people to help out in your area, who do you think they are going to go for? The person who he or she doesn't know who randomly emailed them about getting sponsored or you, the one person who she/he became friends with after you striked up a conversation about how Ken Roczen's arm looked like corned beef hash after his crash at A2?.... Get the point? These stories happen everyday at almost every local track or race.  Being social, kind, and open to making friendships goes a long way in this industry.  It's not about who you know, it's all about who knows YOU.

As you can see, navigating and getting the most out of the MX and SX industry is all about the connections that you make.  If you ask a majority of the mechanics on the line at a Pro race, they would all say that they got into their roles from the relationships and connections that they made.  You can never know too many people and it always pays to have a lot of people in your corner.  Being at the forefront of people's mind when they are giving out opportunities that directly align with what you want is the name of the game.  Make sure you are taking every opportunity to make valuable connections at the track, at the local shops, online, at the races, in the Pro pits, and even connecting with the annoying race announcer guys at the local weekend races....

Always make sure that you are making connections and talking with riders and others in the industry.  These types of relationships can yield incredible opportunities for both parties and set you up for success.

Always make sure that you are making connections and talking with riders and others in the industry.  These types of relationships can yield incredible opportunities for both parties and set you up for success.

Step 4) Be part of the action -join clubs, groups, and race classes

One of the best ways to get noticed is joining a riding club or organization that has a big outreach or platform.  Racing in big area competitions and with clubs that have a big social media following or video coverage can have a huge impact on you getting noticed.  Some races and clubs can generate hundreds of thousands of followers and video coverage of this magnitude can reach even more.  Getting your face or shots of you riding in these can propel you to that next step.  There have been a lot of racers who leaped frogged in popularity thanks to being featured in a video from a big race or from being tagged on social media by one of the race organizations with a large following.  This also helps out even more if you already have sponsors that you wish to highlight.  Getting your sponsors seen on a national scale solidifies your value as a sponsored rider and motivates them to work with you on upcoming seasons or projects...it's a win for them and a win for you!

Classes and camps are a great way to learn, make connections, and stand out.  They can help to shape your racing skills and its a great opportunity to learn about the industry from pro riders up close.

Classes and camps are a great way to learn, make connections, and stand out.  They can help to shape your racing skills and its a great opportunity to learn about the industry from pro riders up close.

5) Get to know your local reps and sponsors

This ties directly into being social and putting yourself out there.  Often times people don't think to talk to their local reps of MX companies that they like or buy products from.  These are great relationships to have and are often times the easiest and most sure fire way to get noticed and supported.  There are a lot of MX companies all over that have regional reps that travel to races, shops, and other events.  Many times they are on the search for new vendors or shops to sell to and even new talent to represent the brand.  Why not have that person be you?! Find out who your local reps are and build a relationship.  A few of us have done this and it's led to lasting relationships with opportunities to become sponsored, test new products and bikes, and even ride with some of our favorite pro riders!  Also, don't be afraid to hit up local businesses in your area like hardware stores, auto centers, or even restaurants. After all, who wouldn't want to be associated with a Motocross racer?!  Trust us, it works!

Reaching out to reps and sponsors can go very far and help keep you on the track each weekend.  This sport can be very costly, but the right level of support and help can ensure your season won't get cut short.

Reaching out to reps and sponsors can go very far and help keep you on the track each weekend.  This sport can be very costly, but the right level of support and help can ensure your season won't get cut short.

6) Learn from others

One of the best ways to learn or master anything is to get a good teacher or to use someone as a great example.  We all do this when we buy "How to videos" from our favorite riders.  We can apply this directly to getting noticed and supported.  Try to talk to or follow the example of some other riders who have the level of support and attention that you aspire to have.  What are some of the tools they are using to put themselves out there?  How are their results? How did they get their support? Don't be afraid to ask them and see what advice the have.  It's always a great idea to check out their social media presence and how they interact with everyone.

It never hurts to keep an eye out for what the faster and more heavily supported riders are doing to get to the next level.  It's always good to push yourself and try new ways to up your game!

It never hurts to keep an eye out for what the faster and more heavily supported riders are doing to get to the next level.  It's always good to push yourself and try new ways to up your game!

7) Keep your set up clean!

This is another big one to make note of!  Keeping your bike, gear, and overall set up clean and professional looking really makes you stand out.  Think back to when you were at the track and a super clean and pro looking bike rolled up to the track.  What was your first thought? $20 says it was, "Wow that person must be good!" We all think it.  Really cleaning and getting your bike looking like a pro's bike will attract a lot of attention and shows sponsors that you take pride in your bike.  Brands want to make sure that their stickers and logo are shown in the best way possible.  This is the reason why so many pro mechanics spend so much time keeping the pro bikes looking clean and polished.  Spend a little extra time scrubbing your ride and making sure that the scuff marks and all of the dirt is off the bike.  Also, it's good to go over the bike with some polish or tire shine to really make it pop.  Check out one of our previous articles on keeping your bike Pro level clean.

This also extends to your gear set up.  Nothing looks worse than showing up with gear already mud splattered and helmets with broken visors for example.  Make sure that your gear is cleaned after each ride and that nothing is missing or broken.  Everything should be clean and as pro like as possible.  This doesn't mean that you need the latest and greatest gear, but making sure it's devoid of tears, stains, and any other damage is the goal.  Making sure that your set up is as #lit as possible without breaking the bank is very do-able for racers on a budget.  

There's nothing that stands out better than a fresh looking bike.  Sponsors greatly appreciate riders and teams that represent their brand well by keeping everything looking ultra professional.

There's nothing that stands out better than a fresh looking bike.  Sponsors greatly appreciate riders and teams that represent their brand well by keeping everything looking ultra professional.

What do you think about these tips?  How can you implement these to make the most out of your racing? Try to apply these tactics and tips and work on getting the attention and help that you need.  Feel free to add in your own personal flare and tricks and feel free to share them with those round you.  Be sure to check out our upcoming articles on more industry tips, interviews, and contests.

Photo credits (IG):

@mannyfresh_860

@ddrakes175

@ajcatanzaro

@cadeclason

@h_miller48

@dlb21racing

@lauracristineh

The inside scoop on Pro Sponsorship

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One of the many great things about our sport is the incredible level of support that is all around us.  If you are anything like us then you marvel at all of the highly supported and ultra-trick factory bikes of the top riders.  Brands like Toyota, Red Bull, Alpinestars, Monster, and Microsoft have all had representation in the sport with both top level factory teams and smaller support efforts.  As any fan of the sport can attest, it's encouraging to see such well-known brands get behind the relatively small industries of Motocross and Supercross.  When it comes to support, it is very obvious to see why the top riders and teams have such big sponsors behind them.  They have the attention of the fans at the races, they are always on the podium, and riders everywhere want the same parts and gear as the pros in their very own garages.  But have you ever wondered why some riders get sponsored while others don't?  Have you been curious about why one rider can be doing very well, but can't seem to lock down the same level of sponsorship as the guys he or she is beating?  Well, it turns out there are a number of reasons why this happens.  We were curious to find out more about what the whole "sponsorship world" boils down to and how we could help our readers and fans apply some general tips and tricks to get more support.  

Andy White has worked with some of the most famous and highly talented privateers and satellite supported riders around.  As FXR brand manager he is front and center for rider support and sponsorship negotiations.  His experience allows him to elevate the FXR brand and help riders all the same time.

Andy White has worked with some of the most famous and highly talented privateers and satellite supported riders around.  As FXR brand manager he is front and center for rider support and sponsorship negotiations.  His experience allows him to elevate the FXR brand and help riders all the same time.

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During our search for answers we reached out to two well known industry insiders to get the inside scoop.  First was FXR Racing brand manager and all around moto-insider Andy White.  Andy has experience as a rider/racer along with several other roles, including team manager of a full race team some years back.  In his 20 plus year run in the industry Andy has amassed quite the knowledge base.  His latest role with FXR gives him an expert point of view on what goes into sponsoring a rider.  Our second expert source came from current Rockwell Racing's team manager and moto die-hard Chris Elliott.  Chris has also held several high profile positions within the sport and has extensive knowledge on the racing sponsorship topic.  Thanks to the insight from these industry experts, and others within the sport, we got the low-down on what the pro sponsorship scene consists of...

Chris Elliott manages a major racing outfit and is in charge of finding talent to bring to the team. (credit: Krystyn Slack)  

Chris Elliott manages a major racing outfit and is in charge of finding talent to bring to the team. (credit: Krystyn Slack)  

Chris brings years of experience in the industry to the team and builds special relationships with the riders. He knows exactly what makes a rider worth sponsoring. (credit:Krystyn Slack)

Chris brings years of experience in the industry to the team and builds special relationships with the riders. He knows exactly what makes a rider worth sponsoring. (credit:Krystyn Slack)

What is your role within the industry?

(A.W.) Well I actually wear a few hats right now as FXR is new to the off road industry. I am the Brand manager/ rider rep/ inventory control and much more

(C.E.) I have done a little bit of everything in this industry…but right now, I am the Race Team Manager for the ROCKWELL RACING Nuclear Blast Records FXR team.

How did you get into this role?

(A.W.) I just finished up working for KTM Canada and I was talking to Aaron Weibe from FXR about his racing. Next thing you know I was consulting for FXR in 2015, then it turned in to a full time position.

(C.E.) That’s a long story and unlikely story. I am originally from Kaministiquia, Ontario Canada and my first “break” in the industry was as a FMX writer for Direct Motocross in Canada…from there I started my own site called FMXnews.com; shortly after launching FMXnews.com, I was luckily enough to get on with ESPN as a writer. It was a pretty unlikely scenario from me, especially if you asked me ten years ago if I’d ever be a writer, let alone contribute written content to ESPN. After my time at ESPN, I got into digital marketing with a company called Media Axe. In my time at Media Axe, I ran accounts in Indy Car, SST, of course moto and even a Super Bowl campaign. I ended up with a KTM team for what was supposed to be just a Saturdays only contract and that is where I met Clarky (Ryan Clark). After 2016, he and I decide to run our own program, found the perfect partners over at Rockwell Watches and here we are.

Sponsorship can make or break a rider and team.  Support at any level is a much needed benefit that keeps riders racing and competition week in and week out.  At the privateer level a good supportive group and sponsor can elevate you to the next level.

Sponsorship can make or break a rider and team.  Support at any level is a much needed benefit that keeps riders racing and competition week in and week out.  At the privateer level a good supportive group and sponsor can elevate you to the next level.

What was your introduction to the sport?

(A.W.) I rode a mini bike when I was 8 years old and I was hooked! I then started racing at the age of 16. I worked my way up to the pro class and now I am still riding and race the occasional vet race.

(C.E.) I like most kids just had cool Dad who used to ride and it was kind of our thing. It definitely helped to have rad parents who were willing to spend a ton of money to go racing and have fun at the track as a family. My uncle had used to race at a pretty decent level when he was younger so he was involved a fair bit. I was NOT very fast, but we had fun.

Why do companies sponsor riders?

(A.W.) They sponsor riders to help brand the company.  This brings attention to the company and translates in to sales from consumers/customers.

(C.E.) That’s a tricky one, cause I am on the other side of that coin. But I would say traditionally it comes down to marketing, whether you are paying a rider or just giving them product at a discount; you would look at the rider as an investment in your brand. In most cases, your hope would be there is a return on that relationship, which could be something a little as brand recognition at local tracks, to the best case scenario in that a rider you sponsored would help influence consumers to purchase your product giving you that return on the initial investment of sponsoring that rider(s).

Sponsors love when their athletes interact with fans and the media.  The more likable and open a rider is, the more marketable and value added the rider is.  Aj Catanzaro was a perfect example of great customer interaction at the 2017 Atlanta SX rounds.  Acts like these led to him being signed with FXR Racing and the Rockwell Race team for 2018.

Sponsors love when their athletes interact with fans and the media.  The more likable and open a rider is, the more marketable and value added the rider is.  Aj Catanzaro was a perfect example of great customer interaction at the 2017 Atlanta SX rounds.  Acts like these led to him being signed with FXR Racing and the Rockwell Race team for 2018.

What are some of the things that sponsors look for in a rider?

(A.W.)  Good question, Results, Social media , well liked . As for the different types of sponsorship levels there are discounted programs all the way up to fully paid athletes in Pro Motocross and Supercross.

(C.E.) If you are talking OEMs and million dollar contracts, usually the decisions start and stop with results. But for me handling a non-factory supported team, my big thing is marketability. And in that I mean how the person handles themselves both on and off the track, and at times the most important one is on their social medias. The easiest way to track numbers/influence is through social media analytics and brands can/have/will use this when negotiating with riders based on what they feel their influence on fans (consumers) may be…

What are some common misconceptions from riders about sponsorship?

(A.W.) Some think they deserve way more than we offer them. They forget we talk to the other companies and we usually know what the support levels are out there.

(C.E.) Again, OEMS want results. But brands dealing with amateurs and smaller teams team may take a different approach. Like I said for me, I don’t get to concerned with how many 16th place finishes a rider had last year and not because that isn’t extremely respectable. It’s because that usually doesn’t move the needle for brands, I challenge someone on the spot to tell me who finished 7th in Dallas last year. You CAN’T, and you probably couldn’t tell me third place either…maybe you could recall who won, but that is it. If you are not winning, brands want activation both at events and digitally. We want kids that are going to help market and push our sponsors (who are our business partners) while giving it their all on the track every night.

Professional sponsorship and support gives some riders the best equipment along with financial support to cover the immense costs of racing.

Professional sponsorship and support gives some riders the best equipment along with financial support to cover the immense costs of racing.

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How have you seen the sponsor/rider relationship change in recent years?

(A.W.) Its been pretty consistent , however I do see riders jumping from company to company with no real loyalty in recent years.

(C.E.) The digital platform, more specifically social media has allowed riders to take their careers into their own hands. With the ability to have a presence almost instantly online, riders are able to be their own publicist 24/7 and if done properly, their worth can grow.

How have social media outlets influenced the sponsorship process/consideration?

(A.W.) They help, its easy for us to see if the rider is social or not. We are looking for riders that post nice pictures and thank their sponsors.  Gratitude and holding up their end of the deal is crucial.

(C.E.) Obviously you should treat your social platform like your own marketing firm and your clients are your sponsors. You constantly want to engage your sponsors in a positive way with your followers as much as you can. I would also recommend keep it clean when posting “non-moto’ content. Everyone is entitled to own beliefs, but engaging in any religious, political, or vulgar content creation may hurt your bid for sponsorship depending on brand.

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Social media interaction is increasingly becoming one of the most important factors that sponsors looks at when it comes to signing a rider.  

Social media interaction is increasingly becoming one of the most important factors that sponsors looks at when it comes to signing a rider.  

What can the average racer at any level do to increase their chances of getting sponsored?

(A.W.) Good results, post on social media, keep your set up clean. Network in the industry and be friendly. The industry is small so its easy for reps like me to call another industry person and get feed back on a rider.

(C.E.) Just be the best person you can be. Real recognizes real and as long as you are riding well, have a clean look, and put in the effort to promote your sponsors. Brands will reward you!

Which riders do you see needing more support or sponsorship?  What are some attributes that they need to get them to the next level?

Which riders do you see needing more support or sponsorship?  What are some attributes that they need to get them to the next level?

Andy and Chris both know sponsorships and how they benefit both the rider and company.  In a sport like Motocross and Supercross sponsorship is a must for so many.  They enable the industry to thrive and take our racing heroes to the next level.  Stay tuned for a step by step guide to how YOU can apply these guidelines and insights to get sponsored and get to your racing goals. 

Chris Elliott - Rockwell Racing team

Andy White - FXR Racing

 

 

 

2018 TCE SX Fan Experience NOW OPEN for sign ups!

As the 2018 race season nears fans all over the world are itching for the start of yet another action packed season.  We are excited to announce the return of the program for 2018 and that sign-ups for our first round of Tier 1 riders are now open to the general public.  More riders will be announced in the coming weeks.  TCE has also opened up the program for the entire race season per popular request from our great fan base.  Race enthusiasts now have the opportunity to shadow and go behind the scenes with their favorite privateer riders at every round of the 2018 Monster Energy Supercross race season.  This is a great adjustment that has both riders and fans grinning from ear to ear.  For more information about the program be sure to head over the TCE SX Fan Experience page and sign up.  Spots are limited so act now!

2018 Monster Energy Supercross race series schedule:

Round 1 Saturday, January 6, 2018 Anaheim, CA Angel Stadium

Round 2 Saturday, January 13, 2018 Houston, TX NRG Stadium

Round 3 Saturday, January 20, 2018 Anaheim, CA Angel Stadium

Round 4 Saturday, January 27, 2018 Glendale, AZ U. of Phoenix Stadium

Round 5 Saturday, February 3, 2018 Oakland, CA Oakland Alameda Coliseum

Round 6 Saturday, February 10, 2018 San Diego, CA Petco Park

Round 7 Saturday, February 17, 2018 Arlington, TX AT&T Stadium

Round 8 Saturday, February 24, 2018 Tampa, FL Raymond James Stadium 

Round 9 Saturday, March 3, 2018 Atlanta, GA Mercedes-Benz Stadium

Round 10 Saturday, March 10, 2018 Daytona, FL Daytona Intl. Speedway

Round 11 Saturday, March 17, 2018 St. Louis, MO Dome at America's Center

Round 12 Saturday, March 24, 2018 Indianapolis, IN Lucas Oil Stadium

Round 13 Saturday, April 7, 2018 Seattle, WA Centurylink Field

Round 14 Saturday, April 14, 2018 Minneapolis, MN U.S. Bank Stadium

Round 15 Saturday, April 21, 2018 Foxborough, MA Gillette Stadium

Round 16 Saturday, April 28, 2018 Salt Lake City, UT Rice-Eccles Stadium

Round 17 Saturday, May 5, 2018 Las Vegas, NV Sam Boyd Stadium

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TCE Dream Chasers with Tayler Kaplan

 

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One of the great things about the Moto industry is that there are so many different facets and avenues to pursue within this quickly expanding industry.  From racer to mechanic to promoter to sponsor, there are tons of different paths to travel down.  One of the most sought after positions within the industry is the role of brand ambassador or model for some of the top brands in racing.  The lucky few in these roles are adored by fans and enjoy the spotlight from magazines, websites, and even live shows.  One lucky new comer to the scene is Connecticut's own Tayler Kaplan.  Tayler has been apart of the racing world her whole life and somewhat recently embarked on a journey to become one of the leading brand embassadors in Supercross and Motocross.  We took some time to talk to Tayler about her racing past, the industry, and what it was like being featured by Transworld Motocross.

Hey Tayler, so for those out there that maybe unfamiliar with you tell everyone where you're from and little bit about yourself.

Hi everyone, and thanks again to TCE for having me! I’m Tayler and I’m 20 years old, New England born and raised. I have been a promotional model for about 3 years now and I’ve established myself a niche in the world of motorsports. Growing up, I attended just about every major motocross event on the East Coast from Canada to Florida so it’s such an incredible feeling getting to be hands-on and involved in the sport. I attended my first Supercross when I was 3 months old at Daytona in 1997 which planted the seed for a lifelong love of all things motocross. My dad tossed me on a PW50 with training wheels as soon as I could walk, but as far as riding goes these days I pretty much stick to ripping pitbikes under the lights in our yard! To follow my journey you can find me on Instagram @TheTaylerKaplan or on Facebook as Tayler Kaplan.

How did you and your family get into the sport of Motocross?

Oh man, it goes way back. I come from a long line of motocross enthusiasts. My Dad got his first bike as a Christmas gift in the early 70’s and his whole life has essentially revolved around the sport since then. He even rode through the hallways of his high school on a dare once- he’s a very balls-to-the-wall type of guy. For around 30 years he raced the New England circuit with clubs like NESC, NEMX, and NEMA (RIP), which meant that we were always traveling. Eventually, my brother and sister started racing too so it was a total family affair. My sister won a championship against a class of all boys once when she was 6 which was badass. As for me, I played pit chick and loved it ironically. I worked with some of the tracks running the 30 Second Board and flagging while my family raced. Every family vacation revolved around some sort of motorcycle event, most often Daytona. I guess the point that I’m getting at is that I didn’t really have much of a choice, at the beginning at least. But even when my dad couldn’t make it, I carried on the tradition myself. Last year I drove up to the Unadilla national in my Corolla and had full intentions of sleeping in it until a very good friend who was racing that weekend let me hang out with them.

Tayler's family has an extensive racing history in New England.  Racing is in Tayler's blood and her connection to the industry has helped propel her into national recognition.  Above Tayler and her dad Ken pose aboard some fresh Suzukis.

Tayler's family has an extensive racing history in New England.  Racing is in Tayler's blood and her connection to the industry has helped propel her into national recognition.  Above Tayler and her dad Ken pose aboard some fresh Suzukis.

What led to you wanting to pursue a career in modeling/brand endorsing?

Being a young girl attending Supercross races, I always looked up the Monster Energy girls. In my mind they were a symbol of the perfect mix between beauty and badassery: something I knew I had to be a part of. On top of that, I was always tall, and when you’re tall you constantly get asked two questions: 1. Do you play basketball? Or 2. Well you must be a model then, right? Eventually I realized I had to at least give modeling a shot (I’m far from coordinated so ball sports were never an option), so at 12 years old I started working with my first modeling agency. High fashion modeling was always boring to me (and kind of ugly- oops, did I say that?), so I’ve always focused on the commercial and promotional side of the industry. It’s truly all I’ve ever wanted for as long as I can remember. I’m a huge marketing nut as well.  Right now I’m studying Digital Marketing with Duke University online so promotional modeling is the perfect crossroad since I get to market and promote different brands on site. My first promotional gig, however, was as a spokesmodel representing Progressive Motorcycle Insurance at Laconia Bike Week, which was a crazy experience. I knew this from my years attending Daytona Bike Week, but the biker community is so different from the moto community, especially from the aspect of a promotional model- the energy is just completely different. From there, I continued to market and brand myself and began to receive offers from different agencies and companies that wanted to work with me.

What's the most exciting aspect of this career in your opinion?

The most exciting aspect of this career path is the ability it gives you to travel and meet so many like-minded people. Representing Fly Racing at the Southwick National (my home track) was by far one of the most fun days of my life. I got to take photos and talk with hundreds and hundreds of moto fiends from all over the region. I also love the fact that there’s no limit as to where you can take this. There are endless opportunities in the modeling world and so many different ways to use your platform. As I grow my own platform, I plan to start spearheading a motorcycle safety outreach. In the past few years I have lost (and almost lost) way too many people from motorsports incidents. I really hope to bring some awareness to the general public and hopefully work towards developing new safety initiatives off-road as well. Look twice, you could save a life!

What has been the most challenging and also the most rewarding part of your journey?

By far, without a doubt, the biggest challenge I have faced as a promotional model is the fact that I live in Connecticut. There are very few opportunities in the industry out here. The only real major moto events are the Southwick and Unadilla nationals, Laconia Bike Week, and most recently Foxborough Supercross which are all held annually. I have plans to move to the west coast in the very near future so it won’t be too much of a problem any longer. I was actually booked for SEMA this week until the agency realized how expensive it would be to get me out there from the sticks of Connecticut! It’s incredibly frustrating that I can’t work on my craft as often as I’d like out here so I can’t possibly get out fast enough. It’s just a matter of getting all of my ducks in a row!

The most rewarding part of the journey has been the fact that I’m able to be immersed in such an incredible culture and represent the brands that I’ve been surrounded by and supporting my entire life. I know it sounds incredibly corny, but it truly does feel like home. Being surrounded by people who are just as passionate as I am is just an added bonus!

Throughout her relatively short stint in the industry Tayler has managed to land some amazing opportunities that allow her to make strides towards her dream role.  

Throughout her relatively short stint in the industry Tayler has managed to land some amazing opportunities that allow her to make strides towards her dream role.  

What's something about this journey and career that most people don't know about? 

This is a tough one! Honestly, I think people underestimate just how much goes on behind the scenes. People laugh at how seriously I take Instagram, but as a model it is a huge business tool for me! Each and every photo I post is an opportunity to be approached by a new photographer, casting agent, or brand that I can collaborate with. Lately I’ve been aiming to shoot at least once per week- which means creating new concepts, putting together the right wardrobe, scouting a location, tracking down props, and finding hair and makeup help. Each and every step of the process is such a blast so I’m definitely lucky for that. I love that I have the ability to orchestrate every aspect of my work and the story my photos tell are all my own.

What are some key things that you have learned along the way?

This journey has taught me so many things about humanity in general. When your job is to put on a revealing outfit and take photos with fans, many of whom are intoxicated on some level, you hear some of the craziest things. At Southwick, a grown man literally got on his knees in front of me and bowed. I love everything about what I do, don’t get me wrong, but it teaches you a lot about interacting with different types of people. I have also learned how important it is to have a thick skin. This asset is absolutely VITAL to be successful in any capacity in the modeling world. The truth is, I’ve been told “no” FAR more times than I’ve been told “yes”. However, if I had stopped the first time I was told I should, I wouldn’t be where I am today, with the honor of being interviewed by TCE or having been featured in Transworld Motocross last week. And I’m just getting started!

What's one thing that you would change about the industry as a whole?

This problem isn’t just limited to the moto or modeling industry, but it is a bit of a challenge to be taken seriously as a woman. It just happens to be ten times more difficult in a male-dominated industry. I hope to be part of the force that changes that, however. I can be pretty, AND pretty smart, too. A woman shouldn’t have to be modest in order to be respected- It’s 2017!

How has your background in the sport helped you break into this role?

My background in the sport helped in that I didn’t really have to break into this role at all, I was basically born into it. Having the right network in the industry surrounding me is huge- people such as Paul Buckley, New England’s most well-connected man in motocross, have become an incredible resource for me. Even if it didn’t morph into a career for me, I would still feel blessed for all of the years I spent growing up involved in motocross.

We've seen you work with Billy of Surge Unlimited on some amazing projects, can you tell us what those were like?

Billy is absolutely incredible and I'm honored to have been able to partner with him on some cool projects. The New England moto scene is pretty tight knit and I always knew Billy through his association with JDay. When I found out he ventured out on his own and started his production company, I approached him with a concept that I wanted to submit to TWMX. I had him meet me in my Dad's abandoned mill complex on a 37 degree November night where we took the red bikini shots on the 500. I was FREEZING. As soon as he finished editing them I immediately submitted them to Transworld. Ironically, I never heard anything from them, until this past Monday night (literally almost a year later) where Don Maeda emailed me "Hey, sorry I never saw this. Can I still post them?" and I woke up the next morning to 200 new followers and about 50 friend requests. We were both pretty stoked to finally see our vision come to fruition and I'm so honored to have gotten national recognition from a magazine I've been reading for as long as I can remember. Last time I checked, my feature had over 800 shares in 48 hours which is pretty cool for some photos that are now a year old! I've also collaborated with Billy on some product shoots for his Surge Unlimited clothing line. That was fun too, besides the part where he made me walk through pricker bushes.

TCE partner and media power house Surge Unlimited got some stellar shots of Tayler in her families incredible motorcycle museum located in historic Connecticut.  The shots came out great and landed Tayler in a feature on the Transworld Motocross website.

TCE partner and media power house Surge Unlimited got some stellar shots of Tayler in her families incredible motorcycle museum located in historic Connecticut.  The shots came out great and landed Tayler in a feature on the Transworld Motocross website.

Surge Unlimited has partnered with The Collective Experience on a few projects as well and the work is unparalleled, what do you think makes Billy stand out as a photographer/videographer?

 I’ve been lucky enough to work with a lot of very talented photographers, but what makes Billy stand out to me is his unique vision. He sets out to each and every shoot with a precise vision in mind and does not leave until he achieves it. We are both very creative-minded so we always end up with some insane images when we join forces.

What are some plans or goals that you have for the future?

I am a firm believer in the law of attraction so I'm going to speak this one into existence: Miss Supercross 2019! I know you’re listening, Feld! ;) As far as short term goals, the first order of business is definitely to get my ass out to the west coast so I can dive right into all the area has to offer. Speaking long-term, I do want to pursue modeling for as long as I possibly can, and start my own business along the way. I constantly have to be involved in exciting and creative endeavors or my mind goes crazy- there’s truly no telling what I’ll end up doing next, but it’s sure to be an adventure!

What keeps you motivated to keep going and pushing to make your dream a reality?

The biggest source of motivation for me is the fact that I’m not where I want to be. I always feel like I can do better or be better. There is so much left out there for me to accomplish, I’m just getting started! I’m still trying to have my voice heard and to be seen by some key players in the industry. Having a clear vision of what you want from your life is the most effective way to stay on track and crush your goals. I won’t stop until I get there.

Always looking for new creative perspectives, Tayler isn't afraid to try new things and stand out with new concepts for shots.

Always looking for new creative perspectives, Tayler isn't afraid to try new things and stand out with new concepts for shots.

There are lots of girls and guys out there that are aspiring to do exactly what you are, what advice would you have for them?

The absolute biggest piece of advice that I can give any guy or girl that wants to pursue this industry is to harness the power of social media. So many people really don't seem to comprehend that they have one of the biggest tools to success in 2017 literally in the palm of their hands. You can connect to the entire world in seconds. I was featured in Transworld Motocross solely off of a Facebook message. Branding yourself is HUGE- create a voice for yourself online, distinguish your character, and work on your craft any chance you can get. Another piece of advice I always give to aspiring models is to stay strong and stay persistent. Keep a clear vision about what you want from your career and don't fold. I'm the type who will literally keep going until I'm told yes, which isn't always a good thing I suppose. But some people do appreciate tenacity! ;)

Lastly, thinking long term, what impact do you hope to have on the industry?

This is a man’s sport that I’m trying to create my own lane in and bring my creativity, entrepreneurial skillset and ambition to play. I want to be a positive representation of the culture that is motocross. Women riders are the fastest growing demographic in the industry and I hope to play a key role in encouraging more women to participate. At the end of the day, I guess all that I can say is time will tell! There are so many things that I want to get involved in- the possibilities are endless. Stay tuned!

Journeys like Tayler's remind us to keep pushing forward and chasing goals.  To keep up with Tayler be sure to follow her @thetaylerkaplan and check out her killer shots.  A special thanks to Surge Unlimited for the shots. For more inspirational stories and interviews with industry insiders be sure to stay tuned to The Collective Experience.

2018 TCE SX Fan Experience schedule announced

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We are excited to announce our 2018 TCE Supercross Fan Experience Program schedule.  We had a very successful and fun filled 2017 Supercross season and we look to continue with that momentum and energy into the upcoming 2018 Monster Energy Supercross race season.  Like the 2017 program fans will be able to have an unparalleled experience unlike any other.  This is your chance to go behind the scenes with the privateer stars of our sport and get an inside look at what it takes to have a professional program at this high level of racing.  Fans get a chance to have one on one interactions with the rider and team members, get exclusive tours of the race set-up with select riders, and get industry level seating courtesy of their favorite rider.  Not to mention the bundles of free swag, photo opportunities and much-much more that is offered to fans.  New for 2018 we are offering a tiered style program with riders based in two separate price groups.  This allows the fans to truly tailor their experience all while keeping the cost at a comparable price level.  As always our program's goal and initiative will be to support privateer race efforts by giving a majority of the cost for each experience directly to the privateer athletes.  It is our goal to positively impact the Supercross and Motocross industry and to provide experiences of a lifetime for our fans.

2018 TCE Supercross Fan Experience schedule:

Round 1 Angel Stadium Anaheim, CA - January 6

Round 7 AT&T Stadium Arlington, TX - February 17

Round 8 Raymond James Stadium Tampa, FL - February 24

Round 9 Mercedes-Benz Stadium Atlanta, GA - March 3

Round 10 Daytona Intl. Speedway Daytona, FL - March 10

Round 11 Dome at America's Center St. Louis, MO - March 17

Round 12 Lucas Oil StadiumIndianapolis, IN - March 24

Round 14 U.S. Bank Stadium Minneapolis, MN - April 14

Round 15 Gillette Stadium Foxborough, MA - April 21

Round 17 Sam Boyd Stadium Las Vegas, NV - May 5

In the coming weeks we will open the program up for sign ups.  Make sure that you stay tuned to the website and our social media pages for updates and possible changes.

Take a look inside the movement that is Privateerlife.MX

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Within the Motocross and Supercross industries it's common knowledge that those at the top of the sport get the most opportunities.  It goes without saying that the attention and spotlight lies solely on those house-hold names and factory.  So what happens to the rest of the pack? What spotlight do the privateers get?  Well, often times they don't get much opportunity or attention.  Over the years it has become increasingly difficult to compete at the top level of racing as a privateer.  The cost of racing in the professional series is astronomical to say the least and many privateers struggle to follow their dreams and make a run at the top.  There are very few companies and programs who are hoping to change this.  The goal of The Collective Experience is change the sport in a positive way and give privateers all over a bigger platform and funding to stay competitive.  Naturally, when we come across others who share the same vision of impact within the sport we do our best to share their story.  Garrett of Privateer Life MX is doing some incredible work with the sports privateers and has been working diligently to help raise funding and awareness for these working class athletes.  We wanted to find out a bit more about Privateer Life MX as well as Garrett's plans for the future.  We hit up Garrett to get the inside scoop on everything.

Hey Garrett! Tell us a little bit about yourself and your background.

I grew up in the Bay Area and was somewhat of a late bloomer when it comes to motorcycles.  My dad taught me how to ride in a creek bed on some old Honda 90 when I was a kid.  I didn't get my own dirt bike until I was probably 21 in college.  I got a '92 KX125 and things progressed from there.  I graduated from Cal Poly with a degree in Mechanical Engineering in '99 and then started riding a lot more. My friends got me into racing Hare Scrambles with District 36 shortly after that.  The hare scrambles started implementing more motocross tracks into their loops and I realized I sucked at riding track so I started practicing and racing Moto exclusively.  I haven't raced in a few years just due to having 2 daughters and life being busy, but I do plan on getting back into it.

What drew you to the sport?

Once you start riding and racing a lot you seem to be drawn to all things motorcycles it seems...almost any discipline you can admire and get excited to watch or participate in.  I've done about every stick and ball sport growing up, lettered in 3 sports in HS and will say by far that Moto is the hardest sport to be at a top level in.  That's where a lot of my admiration comes in for what these guys do.

Where did your passion for the races come from?

When you start racing and then you actually go watch pros in person whether it be SX or MX, you see how good they really are.  Then you obviously buy every video you can get your hands on just to get your fill for watching the pros do what they do.  My other passion just comes from knowing how much work has to go in to being at a top level in this sport and I can appreciate anyone willing to make that much sacrifice to reach their goals.  I've always told anyone that asks that once you ride a dirt bike it's in your blood and you will ride the rest of your life if you can.

Can you explain a little bit about Privateerlife.MX?

Privateerlife.mx was inspired from finding out and seeing just how rough things are out on the road for the guys chasing that dream on a shoestring budget.  They truly are the life's blood of the sport.  Back when the "Great Outdoors" MX Videos were coming out they had a spinoff of those videos called "The Privateers".  I remember watching those with my roommates and seeing how much those guys struggle on the road in every way.  That was probably 10-15 years ago.  As I was watching those videos I just told myself that I would totally let a guy like that come stay at my house, feed him, let him do a load of laundry, etc.  Anything to make his journey a little easier and hopefully save him some money on the back end.  So like any other idea you think of how great it would be, self doubt creeps in and those ideas just never end up seeing the light of day.  So earlier this year I was just looking at my life and told myself that I didn't want to look back when I'm 65 or 75 years old and wonder what if?  So I kicked all that self doubt in the nuts and accepted that I would rather see an idea fail than never try at all and that's when a friend and I started designing the website.  I do want to emphasize that this website isn't just for pro license holders chasing their MX/SX dreams.  This site is for any discipline of motorcycle racing, age, skill level, etc.  Every discipline does a fair amount of traveling as you progress and get more serious with your racing so this is for everybody.

The core of the website has 2 main components....the Supporters and the Racers.  When you sign up as a member of the website (which is free and always will be free) you can sign up as a Supporter, Racer or both.  As part of the sign up process you fill out the information you feel comfortable with and then there is a menu of services or amenities you can click on as a Supporter.  For example, as a Supporter you might have a spare room or couch you'd be willing to let someone crash on as they are going through town, a place to do a load of laundry, a pressure washer to wash their bike, a practice track to ride on, etc.  As a Racer you would go out and do a search when you know the route you'll be traveling and search out in that State or zip code for the services you're looking for.  Hopefully you get a match, contact that Supporter, and make your life on the road a little easier.  A lot of people love this sport, but can't really afford to help a guy out by giving him $50 or $100. However, most people do have resources that aren't money related in the true meaning and can still help a Racer save money on the back end.  This could be by not having to drive around looking for a laundromat, pumping quarters into a laundry machine or pressure washer at a car wash, renting a hotel, or even paying to ride a track

Throughout the 2017 Privateerlife.MX has helped many Pro riders by raising funding for their entries.  Riders from all over were able to get some support and lighten the financial burden that so many privateers have.

Throughout the 2017 Privateerlife.MX has helped many Pro riders by raising funding for their entries.  Riders from all over were able to get some support and lighten the financial burden that so many privateers have.

How did you get involved with the privateers of the sport?

The more you're involved in any discipline of racing the more people you get a chance to meet along the way.  Our sport is unique where you can actually meet and talk to the pros of the sport.  Obviously local pros are a little more accessible and that's where I started by reaching out to a couple local guys I know and they got me in touch with other people and it just snowballed from there.

What motivated you to help out?

I'm, by nature, a person that likes to help people out whenever I can.  Based on that and my love for this sport I realized that the privateers could use the most help and support.

What are some of the goals for Privateerlife.MX?

My biggest goal is to be able to create a community that any and all racers have access to as long as people are racing motorcycles.  If you've been traveling to Loretta's for the last 6 years then you probably have a pretty good network of people you can call on or count on to stay at their place on the drive out.  For a first time guy or girl you probably don't have any resources.  My master plan is to have a turnkey network for someone new to the sport or someone that has been doing it their whole life to make their life easier while traveling around the country chasing whatever goals you have that involve motorcycle racing.

What are some of the things that you need to make the biggest impact?

The biggest thing is just getting the word out.  With all the social media out there I've been able to reach 95% of the racers I've wanted to.  Obviously not all of them write back, but I'm trying to just let them know what we're doing.  I would print out all the guys that signed up and were on the entry list for Arenacross, 250 Supercross, and the premier 450 Supercross and reach out to them on their Instagram accounts to try and spread the word.  That was pretty time intensive and I got my account locked out a couple times on IG because my messages looked so similar I'm sure their algorithm recognized some patterns and probably thought I was some kind of SPAM.

For SX I'm trying to get my guerilla marketing plan in place so when you come out from each round of the SX Series there will be a business card on your windshield telling you what we're about.  I really need industry supporters at this point.  The Racers have been more than willing to sign up so far.

Garrett hosted several cash drawings for Pro riders tor receive funding and gave many riders another level of exposure and attention. 

Garrett hosted several cash drawings for Pro riders tor receive funding and gave many riders another level of exposure and attention. 

What were some of the best and most memorable moments that you've had with Privateerlife.MX?

There have been a few actually.  About 2 months after the site was launched I was lucky enough to get on "Good Day Sacramento" which is a local morning TV show while the Arenacross Series was in town.  That was a little nerve racking as I've never been on TV before, but it went pretty good.  We've also been fortunate enough to be on Daniel Blair's podcast, Main Event Moto, and Brad Gebhardt's podcast, BigMX Radio.  I can't thank those guys enough for helping get the word out.  I'm still working on getting on some other podcasts as well that I think would definitely help get the word out.  VitalMX was also nice enough to let me post about the website when we first went live with the website.

We were only able to make the Oakland SX and Washougal outdoor rounds this year, but by the time Washougal rolled around we had been able to help quite a few guys out financially so it was cool to meet a lot of the guys in person.  All the guys have been very gracious and thankful for what we're doing which is great.

What were some of the challenges that you had with this?

I think the biggest challenge has been getting the word out to fans and potential supporters that this website exists.  I know there are thousands of people that are like me that would be more than willing to help these guys out with resources they already have.

What are the impressions that the riders have of this venture? What are they saying?

I have had great response from the riders.  We were able to actually put together an "Entry Fee Reimbursement Program" this summer for the Nationals that was sponsored by Westside Buidling Materials out of Oakland, CA. We literally picked a different privateer's name out of a hat each week and I would then Paypal them the $245 it costs them to just sign up to try and qualify.  The only stipulation was that you had to be signed up as a Racer on the website and then just message me the rounds you planned on doing.  Joe and Rachel Rodriguez with San Luis Obispo Painting who also happen to be a big sponsor and supporter of the Enticknap brothers caught wind of the reimbursement program and reached out saying they would like to also donate $100/round to a different privateer which was awesome.  We would then have a secondary drawing each week for that and a couple rounds they would donate an extra $100 so a total of 3 lucky guys would get some cash to offset their expenses.  We've had my daughters, Joe and Rachel Rodriguez, Adam and Tyler Enticknap, Chase Stevenson, Zack Williams and one of our amateur LL riders, Tryston Pullin, all pull names out of the hat for us which was pretty cool.  

Who are some of the people/companies that have helped you along the way?

As I mentioned above Tommy Vairetta and Tom Torrez with Westside Building Materials and Joe and Rachel Rodriguez with San Luis Obispo Painting have really helped out and helped get our name out there.  Daniel Blair with Main Event Moto, Brad Gebhardt with BigMX Radio, VitalMX, Good Day Sacramento and all my family and friends that have reposted our social media stuff to help spread the word.  Kelly Campbell with Premier Nutrition out of Oakland, CA was also nice enough to donate a lot of healthy Power Bar products that we would send out as part of a care package to each of the privateers that were picked to reimburse their entry fees.  Also as part of that care package they would get a Westside t-shirt, Privateerlife.mx t-shirt, some nice thick mil stickers and some snacks from Premier Nutrition.

Privateerlife.MX also helps the everyday rider and the network of Supporters and Riders that they are building is a huge benefit to everyone involved.

Privateerlife.MX also helps the everyday rider and the network of Supporters and Riders that they are building is a huge benefit to everyone involved.

What are the plans for 2018?

We've definitely got some plans to bring on additional sponsors for 2018.  We don't have anything set in stone yet, but I'm excited to just talk to a few new people looking to come on board.  Obviously we would love to continue our relationship with the people that have already helped out and hopefully show them some value for their businesses by being involved with us and the sport going into 2018.

We're also working on getting an app put together since that's what most people do these days, but finding the money and time is a little difficult right now.  All the money is going out the door at this point which is fine because we're doing this to help people out and not as a business venture.  Ultimately we would like to get some advertisers within the industry on the website to help offset some cost and make improvements to the website and ultimately the app.

Be sure to check out Privaterlife.MX and follow them on Instagram (@privaterlife.mx) for more announcements and details on the program.  Make sure that you keep an eye out for the local professional privateer near you and cheer on these unsung heroes of our phenomenal sport.

Savij Racing's Broc Schmelyun talks about the new team debut

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A few months ago we featured Broc Schmelyun in a monthly "Dream Chasers" stories about his role as team manager of a professional Supercross and Motocross race team.  Broc gave some incredible insight into the world of racing and shared some of his many experiences in the hopes of inspiring others to get involved in the sport or make some valuable head way into an industry of their dreams.  Broc shares in our sentiment of truly attacking each opportunity that comes your way as a means to get closer to your dream-whatever that may be.  This is evident in each decision and tactical move that Broc and his team makes.  Since our last talk with Broc he has had some big changes to his racing program and has simultaneously embarked on a totally new venture.  We wanted to get the inside scoop from Broc himself and learn about what he has been up to over the past few months...

Since the last time we checked in with you there have been some serious changes with the team and riders.  What happened and what caused the change?

I would rather not comment on my previous employer, but things have been great since the change. The pay is slightly less, but the quality of life is better in my opinion. We had such a great group of guys heading into the season. It was a real bummer to see it kinda fall apart, but we are in a great spot right now. As for Jerry Robin it just wasn't clicking on either side. I believe we both wanted a change. I'm really happy with our decision to pick up Jon-Jon Ames. He really exemplifies what you want in a rider. Jon-Jon is still really young too and I believe you will see a lot of him in the near future. 

Broc is one of the most hands on team managers around.  This is one quality that his team really appreciates and it also gives him another perspective that most mangers don't get to encounter.

Broc is one of the most hands on team managers around.  This is one quality that his team really appreciates and it also gives him another perspective that most mangers don't get to encounter.

How has the team taken the change?

The team morale is up drastically. You might think that losing the big rig and everything for the rest of the year was a huge blow to the program, but we were running on an extremely bare minimum budget anyways. Our bike budget actually increased after the split so we were able to provide closer to what we were capable of. Everyone top to bottom just seems to be happier which is really cool because that is an aura I really try to capture. People ride better when they are happy. 

What have you guys been working on?

We recently started an engine building company called Savij. We have been doing some privateer motors and also some amateurs in this area. (based right below Pittsburgh, PA) I have been hitting some local races and plan to go almost every weekend. I want to make sure the people we help are supported at the track as well. I believe its really important to have trackside support and not many engine builders in this area offer that. Also with my racing background I can help people on the bike and with training tips as well. Overall we want to be a fuller experience for people that need work done to their dirt bikes. 

Chad Sanner works with Jon-Jon Ames' mechanic Justin Kahabka to keep the Savij tuned Waynesburg Yamaha machine running in tip top form.  Each week these guys go over the bike in fine detail to make sure Jon-Jon has what he needs to get the job done.

Chad Sanner works with Jon-Jon Ames' mechanic Justin Kahabka to keep the Savij tuned Waynesburg Yamaha machine running in tip top form.  Each week these guys go over the bike in fine detail to make sure Jon-Jon has what he needs to get the job done.

How did the idea for Savij come about?

Chad Sanner and I both have one goal in common. We really enjoy helping people. We helped a few privateers in motocross and supercross and I had a great feeling from it. We talked about starting an engine building company together and basing it off of helping others to reach heights they may not have been able to without our help. That is where the company idea started. As for the name, I wanted to break the norm of engine building companies. Instead of an industry sounding name or few letters put together I wanted to have something different. I wanted to be able to brand the name itself and above all - I wanted to have something I could picture someone saying they ride for with pride instead of just another company name. We aim to be game changers in many different ways with this opportunity. 

Chad Sanner has a lengthy career in the sport and has a lot of experience. What sets Chad apart from other tuners?

Other builders try to keep up with what Pro Circuit, Geico, or Star are doing. Chad looks to other entities like F1 and finds ways to implement that technology into dirt bike racing. I really believe that he is two steps ahead of a lot of the competition. We had a very low budget this year for the bike. If we race in 2018, we will be much more prepared with something we are more proud of. For 2017 our bike was good, but it wasn't at the level that we were capable of. If we do start from practically scratch this year I am not worried. Chad won "Lites start up team of the year" in 2010 and 2011, I know we will be in good hands between the two of us. 

Chad and Broc are a great team.  Their communication and respect for each other's expertise is second to none and makes the team dynamic much more friendly and enjoyable.

Chad and Broc are a great team.  Their communication and respect for each other's expertise is second to none and makes the team dynamic much more friendly and enjoyable.

Even without the luxuries of their old rig, Broc and Chad still manage to complete the day to day tasks as if nothing has changed. 

Even without the luxuries of their old rig, Broc and Chad still manage to complete the day to day tasks as if nothing has changed. 

How does the Savij team differ from the Blue Buffalo Slater skins team?

There really weren't a lot of changes. The budget was practically identical just from myself and Sanner paying out of pocket. We had some amazing sponsors step up and help us out tremendously to really make it all worthwhile. Waynesburg Yamaha gave us two bikes to help out which was HUGE for us. The freedom of not having everything micro managed was really nice, but the rig made life easier as well. I believe it was a pretty even switch all things considered due to the stress of having to throw everything together in two weeks as opposed to an entire off season. It was such an extremely small period of time. 

How did the riders react to the change?

Jerry was with us when the switch happened. He had the option of going with us or staying with the old team. He chose to move on with us. We rushed for Millville and had a catastrophic day. I rushed everything getting ready and put together and it caught up with us all weekend. I have learned from it and it will not happen again. We mutually decided to split ways after that race. It was just time for a change from both sides. 

We noticed that Jon Ames was a new addition for Unadilla.  How has he adapted to the new bike and team?

Jon Jon has adapted incredibly well. He is a super respectful guy with a great family that all want to see him succeed and are very supportive. Jon Jon rode really well the last couple of rounds. His results didn't always show on paper, but he had an awesome performance at Budds creek running top 10 for half of the Moto. He had a lot of mistakes, but that is just part of being a rookie. Jon will be one to look out for in the future if he keeps with his work ethic and grind. 

250 class rookie Jon-Jon Ames has been a great addition to the team and Broc, along with the rest of the team, enjoys working with him and helping him to reach his professional goals.  They see a lot of talent and dedication in Jon-Jon.

250 class rookie Jon-Jon Ames has been a great addition to the team and Broc, along with the rest of the team, enjoys working with him and helping him to reach his professional goals.  They see a lot of talent and dedication in Jon-Jon.

What are the goals for the team?

Right now our goal is to find some financial contributors for 2018. It would make it a lot easier to have some outside help to shoulder the load while we represent them to the fullest. It could be personal bias, but I don't know of another team who pumped their title sponsor and got more involved than we did this year. We really put Blue Buffalo first and always focused on how to grow their footprint in the sport. Hopefully we have the opportunity to do that for a company next season. 

What are the plans moving forward into the off-season and into 2018?

Right now we are going to focus on Savij and growing that as much as possible. It would be nice to grow that enough to make it a co-title sponsor for 2018. Our brand is built off of high quality products and great customer service; two things I imagine any company would want to be aligned with. 

The team really knows how to make their bikes stand out.  Fans always stop by for a picture of the bike as it is one that definitely catches the eye and is riddled with cool/trick parts.

The team really knows how to make their bikes stand out.  Fans always stop by for a picture of the bike as it is one that definitely catches the eye and is riddled with cool/trick parts.

What does the team need to be successful and gain momentum?

Right now we are in the same position as the riders. We know what we need to do, we know the blueprint, now it's up to us to work for it! It is going to take a lot of hard work and a lot of grinding, but I know we are prepared for the challenge. Hard work and sweat are needed most right now.

Who has been some of your biggest supporters during the change?

There are so many to name. On top of all of our sponsors Waynesburg Yamaha, Enzo, FMF, Defiance, Rekluse, Renn Fuel, Ride Engineering, Dunlop, Evans Coolant, Mika Metals, Guts Racing, Vortex, MotoTape, Lightspeed Carbon, Moto Hose, SuperTech, Twin Air, Matrix Concepts, 180 Decals, Tamer, ICW, Acerbis, and Bristol Core I had a lot of help from Chad Sanner, Justin Kahabka, Jay Cavanaugh, Billy Chamberlain,  Bill Dill, Dave Drakes, Casey Scheman, my mom, dad and girlfriend. So many people had to work together to make it all work and I am very thankful.  

Broc and team are always full of smiles, even in some not so favorable circumstances.  The team truly is run like a family and everyone is welcome, respected, and given what they need to reach success.

Broc and team are always full of smiles, even in some not so favorable circumstances.  The team truly is run like a family and everyone is welcome, respected, and given what they need to reach success.

Your group is always seen with a smile and it has a very "family-like" feel.  What makes the difference for you guys?

I have to credit that to everyone else. I try to have fun in every aspect of life and luckily the guys are cool enough to go along with it. We always have some bet rolling or some type of challenge to keep it fun and exciting. We never have a dull moment. Plus, I think it is hard to not smile while you are helping others. As long as that is our goal we should always be smiling from ear to ear!

 

Be sure to keep up with Broc and the Savij team in the coming months to see how the team is coming along.  As always check out the TCE Instagram page for more thrilling photos and a look inside the life of privateer riders and teams.

 

 

Save big on new FXR Racing gear with TCE promo code

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FXR Racing has partnered up with The Collective Experience to offer Motocross and Supercross fans a humongous discount on FXR Racing gear.  FXR Racing has ties to some of the best racers and off-road riding superstars in the world.  At any race world-wide you can spot FXR gear on top finishing riders and championship title holders such as Canada's Shawn Maffenbeier who took home the MX2 title during the 2017 Canadian Outdoor Pro series.  FXR stands out with their unique and ground breaking styling paired with some of the most durable gear sets offered today.  The vibrant color ways and modern design will have any rider standing out from the crowd wether you're a weekend warrior or dedicated racer, this gear is for you.  For 2017 TCE had several FXR Racing riders signed onto our program such as Jerry Robin, Cade Clason, Alex Ray, and Henry Miller.  Each rider agrees that FXR goes above and beyond for their riders and treats each local amateur and beginner just like their pro racing athletes.  Join the best riders in the world and choose FXR Racing gear.  To save 30% on your next gear purchase use promo code "TCEFXR3012".  Fans that sign up for the TCE Motocross or Supercross Fan Experience receive a promo code that saves even more! Head over to fxrracing.com today and get hooked up liked the world's best.

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Shadow Adam "Seven-Duece-Duece" Enticknap at the Monster Energy Cup

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For the upcoming 2017 Monster Energy Cup we are offering race fans the chance to shadow privateer superstar Adam "Seven-Duece-Duece" Enticknap.  Adam will make his return to racing following a devastating crash sustained at the final round of the 2017 Monster Energy Supercross series.  The TPJ Honda rider will be looking to score some respectable finishes and use this race as a training tool for next year's 5 month long series.  Adam will be showing fans around the pits and will give them the star treatment like a true industry insider.  This is an incredibly opportunity to learn what the industry is all about and to get the true behind the scenes look at a professional racing effort.  Fans can expect to get guest passes complete with unrestricted access to Adam and his team throughout the day.  As expected from TCE we will be sending each fan some awesome freebies and will make sure that they go home with some killer connections.  Enjoy the biggest race of the year like a true special guest of one of the biggest personalities in Motocross/Supercross.  For more information click here.

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TCE Dream Chasers with Ashley "Crashley" Yant-Blaylock

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It's almost impossible for anyone of us to travel to a Motocross or Supercross event and not want to take pictures.  We all want to capture the incredible moments and the unforgettable memories that we have made at what is, for many of us, the most amazing event in the world.  After any race the flood of photos from fans on social media is almost overwhelming.  Combing through thousands of hash tags and tagged pictures it becomes apparent that there is definitely something special about capturing the precious moments of a motorcycle race.  For many of us, we just take pictures to record the memory, but for some it is a passion that burns deep.  The very skilled and talented among us use the art of photography to tell a story and often times see something that is right in front of us in a new and unique light.  Professional photographers can be seen all over a racetrack using their specialized equipment to take stunning shots that most of us drool over.  

As the sport and industry grow in popularity the demands for coverage grows exponentially.  It is not uncommon to see more and more photographers and videographers emerging from all over the country.  Despite the large influx of talented hopefuls looking to make their mark, only a select few make it to the stage of a Pro Supercross or Motocross event.  At this level nothing is restricted and access is an after thought.  These lucky individuals get a chance to meet and interact with the heroes of the sport face to face; they get close enough to the action to feel the earth rumble under their feet as the best racers in the world battle right in front of their lens.  It is truly is one of the most thrilling jobs on the planet.  Ashley "Crashley" Yant-Blaylock is one such lucky photographer/videographer.  Ashley, through her media company OC Media, has taken her passion, work ethic, and talent to incredible heights and now calls some of the best photographers in the industry her contemporaries.  We had the chance to sit down with Ashley and learn from her about what it takes to be a photographer and videographer in the sport, and how others can as well with a little handwork and dedication...

Who are you and where are you from? 

My name is Ashley Yant – Blaylock, but most know me as Crashley! I am from Portland, Oregon.

What do you do? 

I am a college student currently getting my Bachelors of Fine Arts in Digital Film and Video. Besides my personal Instagram I have been working on building, learning and growing the media accounts that highlight my work (YouTube, Instagram, Facebook) with photos & videos of my story telling journey; which has recently led me to a great opportunity with Moto Stuff. I help out their company and Instagram page by creating about 3-5 posts per week and at least 1 video per month. My biggest and first priority is team/rider reports.  From there it can be anything from interviews to creating original content. Whether that's taking photos, filming, reposting, editing, or interviewing, I’m their gal! The cool thing about Moto Stuff is that they are all about support, collaboration and getting creative. From the get go they told me that they wanted to integrate my company, OCMedia, by working together to help get my name out there as well! We help each other out and it's really cool! So on top of Instagram marketing I spend a lot of time at the races and with my father. On September 21, 2015 my father had a stroke while having lunch with his friends at a golf course, which left him paralyzed on his whole left side. Thankfully and amazingly he is recovering so until he is feeling comfortable again I am right by his side. I always set aside quality time to be with my pops. 

How did you get involved with photography?

That's a really good question! I've always been a fan of the photography I just never really saw an opportunity in it for myself or thought about it as a career. Shockingly that all changed when I got a summer job from my grandparents who live in a small town called Moro. I was a truck driver that hauled grain for my grandparents wheat farm in a sweet old school C65 Chevy. Keep in mind that we were farming in the middle of the summer in eastern Oregon where it reaches well over 100 degrees. Often times I had to wait at least 30 minutes or more between truck loads with minimal phone service.  Like anyone I got really-really-really bored and extremely exhausted in the heat.  Wandering outside of my truck one day I started to observe the sights and beauty around me.  It was absolute serenity to say the least.

Ashley aka Crashley can always be found front and center for all of the action!  Motocross photography and videography is her true passion and something that is evident in every move she's makes.  At her home Pro race of the Washougal MX National, she can be spotted running around grabbing some killer shots and working with some of the best in the sport.

Ashley aka Crashley can always be found front and center for all of the action!  Motocross photography and videography is her true passion and something that is evident in every move she's makes.  At her home Pro race of the Washougal MX National, she can be spotted running around grabbing some killer shots and working with some of the best in the sport.

This was back in 2010 just when Instagram started kicking off. I started snapping photos and editing them to save them to post to my Instagram and Facebook after work.  I was really happy with them and only used my iPhone 4. After a few weeks, near the end of the harvest season, my grandma took snap shots of the combines and other heavy equipment, per our tradition. This time she hopped in my truck to get some photos, but she handed me her old Canon camera and said, "Will you take some photos for me? You always have had a good eye for things!" Needles to say it was so much fun and I had a blast. After that I just kept taking beautiful photos and continued to have fun with it. Sadly, I didn't have a camera of my own and I knew I couldn't make a career out of my amateur iPhone pictures. To my surprise my wonderful mother bought me a Nikon D5100 set up at Christmas. I got started taking photos right away. Shortly after that I got really into Motocross and riding.  I had a blast riding, but the expenses and limited travel options forced me to stop. Since I couldn't ride I would venture to the track every Thursday to shoot photos and then soon after I was getting some quality video! I had finally found my calling and combined my heart, passion, and skills. I figured out how to enjoy and learn more about the sport of Motocross without getting hurt! The best part is that I could really be my most truest self. Fast forward to present day and I am still in love with my passion of story telling through photos and videos.  It's been an amazing ride and I can't wait to see what's in store for Official Crashley! 

What brought you into the sport and motorcycles?

Before I got I started playing around with cameras I had no idea what I REALLY wanted to do. At one point I had already attended 3 colleges with for 3 different majors. I just didn't have a foundation for fueling my passion and to help keep me learning about photography consistently. That is, until I bought my first dirt bike! I first found out about it when I was chilling with some buddies and one of them turned on a YouTube video called the Dean Wilson Heli shoot . I was immediately captivated by the whole production. I knew for sure that I wanted to do that. Even though I had never ridden a dirt bike in my life I was completely sold! I saved up some money and on a random Thursday in June 2012 I went into Motosport Hillsboro and said, "I have $2100 and I want a Kawasaki" and left with a 2004 KX125.  

I loved it, but soon after getting it I whiskey throttled, superman-ed, endo-ed, crashed, and established the nickname "Crashley". Like most moto folks I met tons of rad people and was so hooked on the sport and lifestyle. I loved everything about the motocross community, the thrills, the adrenaline, the challenge, and I wanted to learn more! Unfortunately, I was fairly accident prone and not to mention a very broke college student.  This resulted in me retiring my 2004 KX125.  I sold it although I was very understandably bummed.  Even without a bike I still wanted to learn and watch.  It's such an intense sport and compelling sport.  

What sets you apart from other photographers?

That is a very tough question. Honestly, I would say that it's my personality. I'm just a social butterfly with an open mind.  I definitely love to observe my surroundings and find those rare moments to capture that anyone and everyone can admire.  Creating something that inspires and creates memories is absolutely the best feeling to me and I think it shows in my work.

Ashley is no stranger to the pro rigs and always grabs the most amazing action shots.  She uses her talents to get a unique perspective and really capture some intense moments in the sport.  From local races to professional National Championships, Ashley always has her camera ready to snag the shots that inspire all of us to ride!

Ashley is no stranger to the pro rigs and always grabs the most amazing action shots.  She uses her talents to get a unique perspective and really capture some intense moments in the sport.  From local races to professional National Championships, Ashley always has her camera ready to snag the shots that inspire all of us to ride!

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What types of projects have you been apart of?

2014-2015:
I had the amazing opportunity from the Wylder Family (owners of TNMX) to be a video sponsor for the team of  the Thursday Night Motocross which is located in the middle of Portland International Raceway. Shortly before going live on Facebook or Instagram was a thing a classmate of mine and I attempted the first ever live stream broadcast at Portland International Raceway at a Thursday Night Motocross event. It worked out well, but it was definitely laggy since our internet wasn't especially good, but overall it was a cool experience and I learned a lot!  Not bad for a couple of amateurs! I also helped with a charity event around Christmas time where I produced a video with other videographers in the area called "Santa's Mini Moto Revenge" for the Kurt Caselli Foundation Fundraiser.

2015-2016:
When I was working for Red Bull as a Wing Team Member, I had the amazing opportunity to help run the Red Bull PDX Instagram account with some great photos that I took myself which was pretty cool. Working for the company also gave me other media opportunities through Red Bull. One in particular being a video that I produced for the grand opening of iFly Portland with the Red Bull Air Force Team. Through this opportunity at Red Bull I also met a friend who worked at Fly Racing and hooked me up with the opportunity to shoot photos for Fly Racing at 2016 Washougal Nationals.  It was totally bad ass to say the least! Later that year, my buddy Jon Currier (an amazing photographer) got me an opportunity to work with Blowsion Surf Slam. They hired me to produce videos for the weekend event at the Oregon Coast at Pacific City, Oregon. Jon and I also collaborated on a film produced for Gresham Ford in Oregon for a contest where they finished in the top spot. I also got a chance to meet another videographer from the Blowsion Surf Slam event which lead me to travel to Lake Havasu, Arizona to help film and edit the 2016  IJSBA (International Jet Sports Boating Association) World Finals!

2017:

So far this year I have continued working on a documentary with my father on his progress and recovery from his initial stroke back in 2015.  I also had the opportunity to work with Epic Nomad of The Ride of My Life as a videographer at an event called MUFF ( Moto Union Film Festival).  The event is held in Park City, Utah at the historic Egyptian Theatre.  We were able to stay at the Skull Candy Headquarters which is pretty rare for people to do.  We were even able to take a shower in the building! This year is filled with unlimited possibilities, but I am excited to see what is going to be next!

Ashley has a pretty cool set up that helps her immensely when it comes to working with the best.  Even though she didn't always have the most modern or best gear, she always did the best that she could with what she had and continued to improve with each new addition to her equipment arsenal.

Ashley has a pretty cool set up that helps her immensely when it comes to working with the best.  Even though she didn't always have the most modern or best gear, she always did the best that she could with what she had and continued to improve with each new addition to her equipment arsenal.

What's a typical day like for you getting shots at the races?

Oh man, I'm like the Tasmanian Devil when I'm at the races! You only get a certain amount of time to get a shot, so I try to go in places where others are not. If I have seen photos at that particular track I usually try to avoid getting that same shot to make things a little more different. Most of time I go to a place where I can get a really good angle. As you can imagine it's very physical and challenging.  I like to go back to my vehicle to hydrate and recharge every now and then. For me, it's different every time because I like to challenge myself in a way that ensures that I progress. The most important thing that I do when I take photos is review them during my breaks. I delete the bad ones and load them on my computer if needed or I put in a new memory card. It all depends on the race, but that's what makes it an adventure and so fun, you never know what kind of shot you will get!

How do you prepare for getting shots at a race?
 

If it's an overnight type of race I always make sure I have some sort of power nearby for my batteries and memory backup. This usually requires camping of some sort. Whether it's an overnight or day race I always check out the track and scope out some cool options and ideas. It's also important to check the schedule of the day and the race times.  It make it a point to double check what riders or teams are in each class or moto that I'm shooting. It goes without saying that I always double check my that my batteries are charged, memory cards are formatted and that all my equipment is packed to haul. Most importantly, a protein bar, water and gum!

Describe some of the hardest and most rewarding things about your job?
 

For me personally the hardest thing about my job is the pressure that I put on myself to capture that perfect moment or tell the perfect story. I tend to be a perfectionist and sometimes it can be frustrating because I realized and learned quickly that we are our own worst critic. The most rewarding parts of my job are being able to see all the different forms of happiness that is brought out from people that are captivated by that photo or film. It's also an amazing feeling when you are recognized or acknowledged for your work.  It's incredibly rewarding and makes it worth it.

Anytime Ashley is around bikes and photography she is all smiles! It's not hard to miss her at the races and on various projects.  Just look for the lady helping people out and drawning a huge smile in the process.  If you want someone to help you out with getting started, then Crashly is the person for you!

Anytime Ashley is around bikes and photography she is all smiles! It's not hard to miss her at the races and on various projects.  Just look for the lady helping people out and drawning a huge smile in the process.  If you want someone to help you out with getting started, then Crashly is the person for you!

What are somethings you have learned along the way? 

Life is full of surprises and you have to always stay strong by trying not to take business personally. Also, I have definitely learned that I need to pack lighter when I travel and strategize more for a smooth trip. This is key to anyone looking to get involved in the sport. This helps because equipment isn't very light, unlike our iPhones. Something I'm still learning is how to navigate the industry with being a female in something so male dominated. It's intimidating at times, but also gives me a different perspective. I learned you get your freedom when you learn to love and know yourself.  I've also learned you have to ignore the haters because you must be doing something right for them to take time out of their day to talk some smack, right? 

On that note, get to know who you're working with by asking questions and a whole lot of them. This really helps in trying to stay clear and aligned on the project or job. One important thing that I've learned and has helped me is staying positive, meditating, researching a lot, but most importantly being open to learn. Many people tend to stay stagnant, but I've learned to take chances and make sacrifices. When discussing upcoming projects, I've learned communication is critical. When getting booked for a job, make a contract or some sort of documentation of what the job entails and what you and the other party have agreed upon. Always know the who, what, when, where and a payment plan. I've learned to trust my gut too since as humans we are more intuitive than we think or even realize.  

What would you say to people who want to do what you do?

I would say...HELL YES! It's such a rewarding passion to have, for both you and others! Be proud of your work knowing that you captured a moment in time worth a million words, feelings, and memories. If you truly love it then you won't give up, but just know it gets tough sometimes which only means we're learning and makes the reward that much better. Every one of us is unique, so don't be afraid to set yourself apart and be creative. You will be amazed at what beauty you inspire for yourself and others around you.

Crashley takes every opportunity to shoot and work on her craft.  There's never a wasted opportunity when you are pursuing your dreams.

Crashley takes every opportunity to shoot and work on her craft.  There's never a wasted opportunity when you are pursuing your dreams.

How would you inspire them?

I would hope to inspire them with evidence from my own experiences and the experiences of others by encouraging and motivating them not to be afraid.  Anyone can truly be whoever they want to be,  they just have to believe in themselves! I would also invite them to go on an adventure with me and our cameras with no destination set.  Only going to wherever our instincts tell us. That is where our story of inspiration would start.

What are some things they should be aware of?

Be well aware of everything! Getting into this industry can get somewhat expensive, but it's an investment. You are essentially investing in yourself which is your art. This also makes things more enjoyable and achievable. If you love photography then it's worth all the more. Remember to be safe and aware of your surroundings so no one gets hurt. These sports are inherently dangerous if caution isn't taken. Action sports photography requires a lot of camera setting changes, for lighting, speed of object and depth of field. It's also fast paced so you have to know how to get that certain shot you want, keeping in mind the speed that the object is going.  It takes some serious practice, but it'll get easier after every session. This journey will be worth it all when you see each of your finished projects/jobs! Don't let people take you for granted.  If you can, make sure to travel and experience all life has to offer, because just from what I've seen so far, there's a lot! Most importantly always remember to breathe, because it does get tough both physically and mentally so knowing your zen is key!

Crashley doing what she does best.  Most people would dream of being invited into the places that she ventures to, but for her this is an everyday thing.  Hard work and dedication are just a few things that she has used to propel her to where she is today.

Crashley doing what she does best.  Most people would dream of being invited into the places that she ventures to, but for her this is an everyday thing.  Hard work and dedication are just a few things that she has used to propel her to where she is today.


What are you working on to expand yourself, your efforts, and your team? What is in store for you in the future?

I am currently working to expand my media company by continuing to take opportunities that present themselves along with getting creative on different projects that I'm working on. I'm currently trying to figure out different ways to be creative, but also learn different things by branching out and collaborating with people outside of Oregon, which is pretty exciting! This year is all about opportunities to learn and grow, but most importantly to enjoy the journey!

Ashley's story and journery is something that we can all learn from.  Getting into something that you are passionate about is sometimes scary, but is always worth the effort.  In this sport nothing is gained easily at any level however knowing your path or plan and staying dedicated can take you a long way. Be sure to follow Ashley on Instagram (@officialcrashley and @ocmedia_ ) and stay tuned to the TCE site for more monthly highlights and interviews.  

 

TCE Industry Tech tips- Washing your bike like a Pro

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Have you ever wondered how the pros get their bikes so clean and show worthy?  Each week the best riders in the world thrash these marvels of modern technology on the roughest courses imaginable.  Despite this each week the mechanics and teams roll these bikes out of the haulers looking like jewelry.  It's simply amazing how brand new and fresh these bikes are week after week.  Like many of you, after each ride our bikes used to barely come out looking like bikes again.  Most of the time they are covered in dirt, scratches, and marks that seem impossible to come off and get out.  We wanted to find out exactly what the pros do to get these bikes looking so sick at the races.  Who wouldn't want a super sick factory looking bike at each race right?  Of course!  It must be a pretty awesome feeling knowing that you have the cleanest and most professional looking ride out there.  We went straight to the source and asked some of the best mechanics in the business at the Ironman MX National how to get our bikes looking like factory rides....

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Step 1- The prep

With anything that you do proper preparation is critical to a successful outcome.  Dirt bikes are no different.  You want to make sure everything is all set before you dig in and get to work on the bike.  Virtually all mechanics start by plugging the exhaust with something that will prevent any water or debris from entering.  Wash plugs work best, but so does a rag or even duct tape.  Next, most team mechanics take off the seat and air filter and put in an air box cover to enable them to wash the air box thoroughly without water entering the intake.  If you do decide to keep the seat on to try and keep the filter clean for another ride then taping off the gap between the plastics and seat and also the plate grab holes is very helpful.  However, we recommend changing the filter everytime the bike is washed, and so do the pros!

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Step 2- Soaking the bike.

Once you have prepped the bike it's time to get the dirt and mud off.  Tackling the bike from the top down works best and helps you to keep track of what needs to be rinsed next.  Most people rush to use a power washer, which is ideal, but make sure that you go easy on the steering stem and wheels.  These areas house bearings which can be compromised by water that is pushed through by the high pressure.  A garden hose with a high pressure nozzle does the job just fine as well.  Make sure that all thick debris is removed and that the bike is completely wet.  This is the stage where you get the bike as spotless as possible before the real magic is applied.  It is a very helpful trick to lay the bike over with the handle bars resting on the top of a stand to be able to get to the hard to reach places.  You will see almost every mechanic in the pits doing this.  Performing this soaking stage also allows you to see if there is any noticeable damage on the bike and if there is anything that needs to be worked on.

 

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Step 3- Cleaners and elbow grease...

This is the stage where you make the bike clean to the touch.  Get your favorite cleaner/degreaser in a spray bottle and apply to the bike in sections.  Be sure to keep the bike out of direct sunlight if possible.  We recommend some biodegradable products like Purple Power or Simple Green and cut it 50/50 with water.  These don't leave behind any kind of ugly residue.  Make sure that you have some scrub brushes and Scotch Brite pads handy.  Start with the top of the bike and spray generously.  Use the scrub brush to agitate any left over debris and leave a spot free shine.  The scrub brush is useful on the seat, control, rims, plastics, and engine.  Pipe/bottle cleaners and tooth brushes also work very well for tight spots around the engine as well as around the spokes and hubs.  Use the Scotch Brite pad on the frame and plastics to remove the dark scratches and smudges left over from boots and gear.  Majority of mechanics also like to use it on the swingarm and engines to really get them clean.  Brushes and pads do an incredible job of breaking loose any and all dirt and debris.

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Step 4-Rinse and dry.

Once the bike is covered in cleaner and all of the grease and grime has been scrubbed away its time to rinse.  This step is straight forward and, as you guessed, ensures that all of the grime is washed off of the bike.  Again, be mindful of the high pressure hoses and washer around sensitive areas.  Once the bike is all soaked and all of the cleaner and suds is removed, use some compressed air or towels to get the bike nice and dry.  Work from top to bottom again to make the job easier.

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Step 5- Shine, shine, shine.

The last step is to shine that freshly washed bike!  Nothing screams factory more than a shiny bike.  There are many polishes and shiners out there.  We've had amazing luck with automotive tire shine products surprisingly and the price is very affordable.  Most teams stick with dirt bike or motorcycle specific sprays however.  You want to make sure the plastics are covered along with the rims, forks, and swingarm.  Silicone spray brings out a nice shine on the hoses and engine, which helps the bike really stand out.  Be mindful that these products are quite slippery and you may want to apply sparingly to the areas where your legs contact the bike as well as the seat.  Put a small amount of spray shine on a rag and wipe down the cables, bar pad, brake lines, guards, and inside of the radiators; this puts a nice coating on them and prevents that faded look.  Afterwards, make sure that you spray some chain lube on the chain and on the footpeg pivots to make sure that there is a coating to prevent rust from any left over standing water.  WD-40 has worked for many as well.

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Step 6- Step back and marvel at your new looking ride!

This is when you take out your phone and take some sick Insta-bangers to brag about how factory your ride looks.  Keeping your bike as clean as possible makes working on it a lot easier and also makes any issues that you maybe having a little easier to see such as broken parts, leaks, or anything that has fallen off.  Factory team clean bikes also show those guys at the local track that you aren't messing around and since your bike is as clean as a factory race bike, you may just be as a fast as a factory racer....maybe. 

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TCE Race Report-Budds Creek MX National Presented by FXR Racing

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The great part about our TCE MX Fan Experience program is that fans get a complete and immersive experience with the giants of the sport.  No other program offers fan such an in-depth and action packed day at the races.  Our trip to round 11 of the Pro Motocross race series offered nothing less.  The Budds Creek MX track in Mechanicsville, Maryland welcomed race fans to a picturesque race course complete with tons of eye catching attractions.  The championship in each class was heating up and enthusiasts from all over the country and many from overseas wanted to see how the action unfolded and if champions would be crowned at the historic Budds Creek race.  The Savij Racing Waynesberg Yamaha team of Jon Ames came into the event expecting to get some valuable seat time and get used to running with the stars of the sport.  The team was also thrilled to host a long time fan of the sport who was looking to make some connections in the industry and get some valuable experiences working with a team.  Triggr Racing rider Henry Miller was looking to nab another top ten finish and prove to the factory teams that he has the skills needed to get the job done on a regular basis.

Henry Miller had an impressive ride in Moto one despite some bike issues early on in the day.  Sadly, in Moto two he encountered some issues that forced him to pull off.  It was a tough race for the Triggr Racing team, however everyone knows what they are capable of and expect him to be in the top 10 each week.

Henry Miller had an impressive ride in Moto one despite some bike issues early on in the day.  Sadly, in Moto two he encountered some issues that forced him to pull off.  It was a tough race for the Triggr Racing team, however everyone knows what they are capable of and expect him to be in the top 10 each week.

The day started off with Jeremy Martin logging in the fastest practice time in the 250 with a 2:04.187 and Marvin Musquin locking down the fastest lap in the 450 with a 2:04.990.  Fans and industry staff alike were keen on watching Zach Osbourne possibly clinch the 250 championship a race early.  Everyone in attendance watched as the gates were filled for the start of the races.  The 450 first moto with started out with Martin Davalos and Matt Bisceglia leading the pack through lap one.  Davalos has been showing some impressive results in the 450 class and has been a series podium threat.  The two duked it out for several laps as RCH Suzuki's Justin Bogle slowly made his way up to the two leaders and snuck by in a jaw dropping charge.  Bogle rode incredibly smooth and was able to extend his lead over Davalos in second.  Title hopeful Marvin Musquin pushed is Red Bull KTM to third behind Davalos after a late pass was put on HRC rider Cole Seely.  Triggr Racing Yamaha rider Henry Miller had some overheating issues before the first moto after a clamp malfunctioned.  The crew rushed to get him on the gate and ready for battle.  Henry was able to salvage a 18th after a terrible start due to a less than ideal gate pick.  The race ticked on as Musquin made a move past Davalos for second and set himself up for a good points paying race.  Once the checkered flag flew it was Justin Bogle who secured his second win of the season proving that he has what it takes to win.  Points leader Eli Tomac struggled with a 12th place finish, leading everyone to believe that this championship could turn into an all out brawl in the coming motos.

The 3D Racing team has had a great season and their talented rider, Brandon Sharer, was named privateer of the year.  Not bad for a small team from the New England.  These guys have been dedicated all season long and have finally found some success. It will be interesting to see how they carry the momentum into the off-season and beyond.  Keep an eye out for the #154 bike at Ironman MX and the USGP in Florida.

The 3D Racing team has had a great season and their talented rider, Brandon Sharer, was named privateer of the year.  Not bad for a small team from the New England.  These guys have been dedicated all season long and have finally found some success. It will be interesting to see how they carry the momentum into the off-season and beyond.  Keep an eye out for the #154 bike at Ironman MX and the USGP in Florida.

Moto number two for the 450's saw Justin Bogle leading the race early with a surprise battle with Rocky Mountain KTM rider Blake Bagget who got the better of the Bogle and made the pass for the lead.  The two laid down some impressive laps, however a revitalized Eli Tomac was coming through the pack and was looking for redemption following  lack luster first moto.  Tomac sliced through the pack and past Bogle and Bagget to get his Monster Energy Kawasaki to the first place spot.  Musquin rode a hard fought race and was able to salvage a 4th in the second moto.  On the last lap it was clear that Tomac had this race locked up and it was he who took the moto win.  On the day it was Justin Bogle with his first ever premier class overall win followed by Musquin and Tomac in third.  The points chase closed slightly and Tomac knew that he had to be on his toes at Ironman MX in a week's time.  Henry Miller had an unfortunate race as his first moto troubles progressed into more engine trouble as oil was being pushed out of his breather tube.  Henry was forced to pull of after more than half the moto was ran.  Henry and his team soon fixed the issue and secured some much needed resources to get ready for the final round in Indiana.

Jon Ames had a stellar ride in moto one in Budds Creek.  The rookie ran as high as 6th for most of the moto and showed no signs of being a rookie.  It will be very impressive to see him score a top 15 before the end of the season.  The Savij Racing Yamaha that he is riding seems to be working very well for Jon and the team is happy with his progress each week.

Jon Ames had a stellar ride in moto one in Budds Creek.  The rookie ran as high as 6th for most of the moto and showed no signs of being a rookie.  It will be very impressive to see him score a top 15 before the end of the season.  The Savij Racing Yamaha that he is riding seems to be working very well for Jon and the team is happy with his progress each week.

The 250 races delivered no shortage of drama and excitement in the least.  The first moto started off with Pro Circuit Kawasaki rider Adam "AC" Cianciarulo getting the holeshot, however all eyes were on Husqvarna rider Zach Osbourne as he had a vicious crash in the first turn.  Osbourne would remount in near last place and put on a charge to salvage as much points as possible.  UK privateer and MTF rider Steven Clarke also got mixed up in the carnage along with a handful of other riders such as Geico Honda's Chase Sexton.  The rage waged on as Cianciarulo lead with Jeremy Martin hot on his heels and looking to capitalize on any mistakes.  AC rode strong and looked very confident and comfortable up front.  250 class rookie Jon Ames put on a masterful ride as he took his Savij Racing ride to the top 10 and battled in 6th for a majority of the race.  Towards the end Jon made a few minor mistakes and dropped back to 22nd. Jon looked very at home at the higher pace and showed some serious talent rounding each lap.  This was a huge accomplishment for a rookie and a glimmer of hope for the team who is expected to do great with Jon in the coming rides.  As expected Osbourne rode with a lot of aggression and focus as he made his way through the field and towards the front. Osbourne would fight his way to 8th by the end of the moto.  At the end of the race it was Cianciarulo who nailed the first moto win with Jeremy Martin close behind.  A very fast RJ Hampshire worked up the third and silenced many critics. 

Jon Ames and the Savij Racing Waynesberg Yamaha team opened up their group to allow a fan to shadow for the race.  Throughout the day he was able to get up close and personal with Jon and see what a pro race team is all about.  He got a chance to make some serious contacts and get a foot in the door in an industry he loves.

Jon Ames and the Savij Racing Waynesberg Yamaha team opened up their group to allow a fan to shadow for the race.  Throughout the day he was able to get up close and personal with Jon and see what a pro race team is all about.  He got a chance to make some serious contacts and get a foot in the door in an industry he loves.

The second moto saw a pack of factory riders do battle for the top spots in a cluster of passes.  This lead group of Martin, Osbourne, Cianciarulo, Plessinger, and Shane McElrath swapped positions and fought for a top spot.  McElrath rode in first place on his TLD KTM and began to slowly pull away with some brilliant laps and blazing speed.  Martin made a small mistake and went down leaving his chances of a win in the dirt.  Part way through the race Osbourne was able to come through to take the lead away and secure some much needed points to get the title at the races end.  Jon Ames rode strong after a decent start and worked on understanding the track and layout.  Jon would finish up in 22nd again and end the day with a 24th overall.  The 3-6th positions swapped briefly and gave way to several other battles.  This was a spectacle to fans who cheered endlessly with each move and advancement.  At the end it was Osbourne who took the win and the 2017 250 Pro Motocross Championship, making him the best 250 rider all year.  AC would cross he finish line in second giving him his first ever MX overall win as well.  AC was ecstatic and celebrated with his team o the podium.  Osbourne would score second overall and Shane McElrath would finish out third. A very impressive ride. 

The races have been heating up and the action is the best it's been all year.  If you want your chance to experience it as an industry insider than make sure to sign up for the TCE MX Fan Experience.  There's no better way to make lasting connections and get one step closer to your dream position within the industry.

Enter to win an industry guest pass to the Iron Man MX National

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To celebrate the return of both Adam "Seven Duece-Duece" Entricknap and Tyler "Seven Duece-Tres" Entricknap we are giving away an industry guest pass to the final round of the Luca Oil Pro Motocross Championship at the Iron Man MX National in Crawsfordsville, Indiana.  Both Adam and Tyler suffered brutal crashes at the final round of the 2017 Monster Energy Supercross series.  Adam and Tyler have both been going through a rehabilitation process over the past few months and have been finally cleared to ride and train.  These guys have some serious talent and are looking to swing a leg back over their trusty Honda 450s.

Tyler and Adam both made some incredible memories for fans and were an absolute hit.  Fans enjoyed their laid back personalities and off the track antics.

Tyler and Adam both made some incredible memories for fans and were an absolute hit.  Fans enjoyed their laid back personalities and off the track antics.

Adam and Tyler signed onto the TCE SX Fan Experience earlier in the year and have been huge value adders by creating some incredible and lasting memories for fans from all over.  We are cheering these guys on for next season and look forward to document their assault on the 2018 season. If you want a chance to win this incredible FREE giveaway then be sure head over to Instagram and follow @thecollectiveex @the722 and @tylerenticknap723 and tag some buddies.  The winner will be announced this Thursday night.  As always spread the world and make sure you cheer on these hardworking privateer riders.  For more information be sure to contact us and check the website for more updates.

TCE Race Report-Unadilla MX National Presented by FXR Racing

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The Lucas Oil Pro Motocross series roared into the scenic surroundings of New Berlin, New York  for round 10 of the exciting and action packed series.  Known as one of the most captivating and exciting race tracks in the country Unadilla MX offered fans one of the most exciting mud races to date.  With looming storms all over the northeast, everyone waited in anticipation of a "mudder" where the world's best would duke it out on an extremely treacherous racetrack.  All of the riders and teams prepped for the oncoming challenges of the day expecting the worst and hoping for the best.  

In the first round of practice sessions the rain held off and allowed for the best riders in the world to rise to the top of the timing sheet.  Early on in the morning the track was rather deep with a loamy and soft composition which soon gave way to ruts and monstrous braking bumps.  Hoards of fans lined the fences of the historic track before qualifying to get a snap shot of their favorite riders.  Unadilla is known for its famous obstacles like the sky shot, a huge 100+ ft. table top jump that riders everywhere call the best jump for showing off to fans, and a section called "screw you", a near vertical downhill that transitions into an uphill only suited for the toughest riders out there.  

The Unadilla track is one of the favorites for both fans and riders alike.  The dirt is some of the best around and the jumps and hills add to the interest and excitement.  The 450 riders found it especially fun as the track broke in and the lines began to develop allowing them to really push their machines to the limits.

The Unadilla track is one of the favorites for both fans and riders alike.  The dirt is some of the best around and the jumps and hills add to the interest and excitement.  The 450 riders found it especially fun as the track broke in and the lines began to develop allowing them to really push their machines to the limits.

In the premier 450 group Christian Craig, Cooper Webb, Eli Tomac, and Blake Bagget all got some early fast laps out of the way in the first qualifying session.  It was Christian Craig who got his Honda HRC ride out to the top spot of qualifying with 2:06.915 just ahead of the Yamalube Yamaha ride of Cooper Webb.  On a track like Unadilla it was key for the top guys to get comfortable on the track as early as possible.  The New York track often proves tricky and deceiving for many riders and gaining a good feel for it makes all the difference later on in the day.  In the 250 qualifying sessions it was Joey Savagty who got the top nod with a 2:07.657 over Adam Cianciarulo. It was almost unanimous that the track was in prime condition and was shaping up nicely for the races.  

The entire venue was in a buzz by the time the gate fell for the first 250 class moto.  Rookie rider and new TCE athlete Jon "Jon-Jon" Ames was excited to test his skills on a new track and debut his new Savij Racing Yamaha YZ-250F.  The holeshot went to Adam Cianciarulo who led a 2-4 second lead over Joey Savagty in second.  The two carved out some great lines and put on a riding clinic to the cheering fan's delight.  Jon Ames rode strong and battled with newly turned pro rider Joey Crown for most of the moto.  Ames looked to be jelling very well with the very fast and new Yamaha.  Part way through the moto the race got a shake up as race leader Adam Cianciarulo went down in the right hand corner after the finish line jump.  This left the door wide open for Joey Savagty to sneak in and take the checkered flag.   Jeremy Martin worked his way up to the second spot on the podium with red plate holder Zach Osbourne rallying from mid pack to take the final podium in the 250 class.  Early race leader Cianciarulo rode on for a 5th place finish following his small, but costly mistake.  Rookie Jon Ames rode a very hard fought moto losing only a few spots and finally crossing the line in 20th.  Not a bad ride for the rookie on an all new bike and unfamiliar track. 

Rookie rider Jon Ames made his debut with the Savij racing team at Unadilla and was looking to build some confidence and get used to the new machine.

Rookie rider Jon Ames made his debut with the Savij racing team at Unadilla and was looking to build some confidence and get used to the new machine.

A fan favorite for many, Jon felt right at home on the track and was eager to show the industry what he is capable of.  Jon looks to have some top 15 finishes before too long.

A fan favorite for many, Jon felt right at home on the track and was eager to show the industry what he is capable of.  Jon looks to have some top 15 finishes before too long.

In the 450 race it was Red Bull KTM rider Marvin Musquin who shot out to a somewhat early lead after 450 Rookie and RCH Yoshimura Suzuki rider Matt Bisceglia grabbed the coveted holeshot.  The rest of the field filed in trying their best to keep the Bisceglia and team mate Justin Bogle in their sights.  TCE rider Henry Miller was anxious to lock down a great result and carry his momentum forward to the end of the season.  As the riders rounded the first lap it was Marvin Musquin who was making some serious moves through the pack.  He quickly passed Bagget and made his way past Bogle and Bisceglia with precision and sought to take the lead with a sizable gap.  Partway through the moto the Unadilla valley grew dark with ominous cloud coverage and to the die hard moto-fan's delight heavy rains flooded the track.  

The 450 riders were forced to ride cautiously and work on keeping their goggles and controls free of mud as best they could.  In the muddy and flooded conditions Rocky Mountain ATV/MC KTM rider Blake Bagget set charge and chased down Marvin Musquin giving him all he could handle in the waning stage of the race.  Despite the huge efforts put forth by Bagget, Musquin was able to keep him at bay.  Privateer hero Henry Miller battled through the top 15 in the muddy mess.  Even with the slippery and grueling conditions, Henry managed to stay calm and smooth.  To everyones surprise the race was cut short once lightning struck and riders quickly exited the track.  When the checkers fell it was Musquin, Bagget, and Cole Seely rounding out the podium.  Henry Miller was able to grab 14th on his Triggr Racing tuned YZ450F.

Privateer superstar Henry Miller was looking to have a strong finish at Unadilla and finish the year with a bangHenry and his Triggr Racing team prepped as best they could and were poised to due battle with the worlds best at the famous Unadilla race track.

Privateer superstar Henry Miller was looking to have a strong finish at Unadilla and finish the year with a bangHenry and his Triggr Racing team prepped as best they could and were poised to due battle with the worlds best at the famous Unadilla race track.

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Between motos two big storm fronts rolled in delaying the motos and wreaking havoc in the pits as high winds threatened to rip tents apart and even displaced banners and signs all over the track.  Riders and teams struggled to get the bikes washed and prepped as the delays extended longer and longer.  Once the lightning warning passed the 250 riders were allowed to start the race with a 20 minute moto plus 1 lap.  When the gates dropped it was Jeremy Martin who shot out to the early lead with new Pro Rookie and Horizon Award Winner Justin Cooper and team mate RJ Hampshire in tow.  The rain created an absolute war zone for the riders to contend with and standing water on the track reached up to 2.5 ft deep. Bikes were expiring all over the track and by the end of the race Martin had a several second lead over Justin Cooper.  Dylan Ferrandis managed to grab a 3rd in the final moto.  Rookie rider Jon Ames rode strong in the storm and managed a 25th for a 24th overall ride.  Ames is sure to improve as the series moves on and he gets more comfortable on his new team. 

3D racing team owner Bill Dill was nice enough to allow people to beat the rain and harsh weather under his very comfortable and spacious set up.  Everyone was grateful for the hospitality and it gave everyone a chance to unwind and relax as the pre race nerves and gitters started to rise.

3D racing team owner Bill Dill was nice enough to allow people to beat the rain and harsh weather under his very comfortable and spacious set up.  Everyone was grateful for the hospitality and it gave everyone a chance to unwind and relax as the pre race nerves and gitters started to rise.

The second 450 moto was another clean sweep for Marvin Musquin as he managed to get out front early once again and laid waste to the field.  The heavier yet more powerful bikes appeared to be getting the best of some riders and many mistakes were made by riders of all calibers.  Henry Miller managed to stay out of trouble and rode as smart as possible hoping to maintain a top 15 finish.  By the end of the race it was Muquin, followed by 450 Rookies Husqvarna rider Martin Davalos and factory Yamaha rider Cooper Webb.  Needless to say many were left scratching their heads about 450 points leader Eli Tomac’s less than impressive ride.  

Henry made a lucky fans dreams come true at Unadilla.  Ben was the winner of our   TCE MX Fan Experience   giveaway presented by The Motohub.  Ben got the star treatment from Henry and the team and even got a chance to walk away with some killer swag! Ben had more free stuff than he could carry courtesy of Rutted Racing, TCE, and the great folks at FXR Racing.  Check out the sweet signed FXR jersey that he snagged from Henry, complete with a signature.

Henry made a lucky fans dreams come true at Unadilla.  Ben was the winner of our TCE MX Fan Experience giveaway presented by The Motohub.  Ben got the star treatment from Henry and the team and even got a chance to walk away with some killer swag! Ben had more free stuff than he could carry courtesy of Rutted Racing, TCE, and the great folks at FXR Racing.  Check out the sweet signed FXR jersey that he snagged from Henry, complete with a signature.

Fans definitely get more than they bargain for when they sign up for the TCE MX Fan Experience.  We love hooking people up with stuff!

Fans definitely get more than they bargain for when they sign up for the TCE MX Fan Experience.  We love hooking people up with stuff!

As for the TCE riders both Henry Miller and Jon Ames rode well, leaving nothing on the table.  Both guys delivered smart riders and faired well in less than ideal situations.  Henry was pleased with his riding and was eager to talk about the race with fans who were shadowing him and his team all day long.  Henry gave away more cool products than young Ben could carry.  The event rolls into Budds Creek for round 11 of the series in Mechanicsville, Maryland.  Be sure to tune in and catch a glimpse of the TCE riders as they work on capping off the season with great results.  For more information on showing your favorite riders and getting behind the scenes, be sure to reserve your spot and make some stellar connections! 

250 privateer rider Jon Ames joins the TCE MX Fan Experience

We are pleased to announce that Jon Ames has joined the roster of Pro privateer riders on the TCE MX Fan Experience program.  Jon recently joined the newly formed Savij Waynesburg Yamaha race team and is looking to continue his racing efforts to land himself towards the front of the pack.  Jon has had a successful racing career thus far and was once an amateur stand out who garnered quite a media following with impressive results.  In the professional ranks Jon has rode to some impressive finishes and has steadily been improving on his results.  As with any privateer racer progress and consistent top finishes are the goal to ensure a solid foundation and continued support.  Since coming aboard to the TCE MX Fan Experience program Jon is looking forward to meeting lots of fans and giving them a totally immersive experience at Motocross races all over the country.  For more information on Jon and what he's all about, be sure to follow him and catch him and the Savij Waynesburg Yamaha race team at the rest of the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Nationals.  You can sign up to shadow Jon at the Unadilla MX National and at the final round of the outdoor series at the Ironman MX National.  No other program offers this level of behind the scenes interaction and now you can take full advantage and get inside all of the amazing action!

TCE featured on the Big MX Radio Show

The Collective Experience was interviewed and featured on the Big MX radio show with Brad Gebhardt this past Wednesday.  Brad got a detailed look into the program and how The Collective Experience came about.  The program really got the inside information on the true benefits of the program as well as what's on the horizon for the program and it's riders.  Mostly based around the Canadian Motocross scene and US Motocross scene, Big MX radio has it's finger on the pulse of MX in North America.  It is always our goal to spread the word of TCE and help out as many fans and riders/athletes as possible.  The Big MX radio show is a great supporter of the program and hopes to achieve a lot of the same impact that TCE does.  Be sure to check out the interview at Bigmxradio.com and give these guys a follow at Bigmxradio for some awesome content.

Upclose and personal with the Triggr Racing YZ450F of Henry Miller

Privateer stand out rider Henry Miller has been turning heads this 2017 Outdoor Motocross season and really making a name for himself in the ultra competitive 450 class.  Henry has consistently ran down some top level factory riders and has also been a main stay in the top 10.  Those in the know understand what a major achievement this is for a privateer like Henry due to the overwhelming amount of support, parts, and endless resources that the factory teams have.  These highly supported teams often boasts race machines that perform at the absolute limit of modern technology, costing upwards of $100,000-150,000.  These race bikes have very unique parts that are not attainable for people outside of the team.  To put that into perspective the average privateer's bike costs around $10,000 and they are limited to off the shelf parts that any everyday customer can obtain.  

There is a massive disconnect between the factory teams and the smaller privateer efforts.  Everyone involved in the sport is aware of how much better the factory equipment is than the regular parts that a lot of the privateer riders have on their bikes.  This equals out to less engine power, less responsiveness out of the machine, and inferior handling characteristics.  Many privateers are lucky to reach the top 20 with privateer bikes.  This is where Henry Miller and the Triggr Racing comes in.  They have figured out a successful formula for dueling head to head with the factory riders and teams and continue to come out victorious in the end.  Many riders and teams have commented on how competitive, fast, and reliable Henry is this summer and many marvel at this unique and very fast Yamaha YZ450F.  Master tuner Chas Kadlec, Henry's mechanic, is the man behind Henry's great finishes and sweet race bike.  We caught up with Chas to get an inside look at Henry's bike and see exactly what they do to stay in front of some of these factory teams...

Chas is Henry's full time mechanic this year and has been a huge part of Henry's program all summer.  The two work extremely well together and work towards the same goals each weekend.  So far this season these two have been the best performing privateer team in the pits and have beat out a lot of factory riders.  This really shows just how hard they both work and how much talent these two have.

Chas is Henry's full time mechanic this year and has been a huge part of Henry's program all summer.  The two work extremely well together and work towards the same goals each weekend.  So far this season these two have been the best performing privateer team in the pits and have beat out a lot of factory riders.  This really shows just how hard they both work and how much talent these two have.

Chas works meticulously to ensure the bike is in tip top shape come race time. Henry and Chas both give direct feedback after each ride and use this to set up the bike as best as possible.  With the changing conditions and long duration motos this communication is crucial to proper bike set up.  Going up against factory bikes can be tricky, but these two know how to get it done.

Chas works meticulously to ensure the bike is in tip top shape come race time. Henry and Chas both give direct feedback after each ride and use this to set up the bike as best as possible.  With the changing conditions and long duration motos this communication is crucial to proper bike set up.  Going up against factory bikes can be tricky, but these two know how to get it done.

 

"Starting from the top we use Cycra power flow plastic for improved cooling.  We will actually cut the radiator shrouds a bit behind the radiator from the bottom straight up to the first brace. We do this to get the heat out and away from the radiators.  We also use Mototape frame grip tape. This helps Henry really get a great grip on the bike in loose or rough conditions.  We also run grip tape on the subframe where his boots would rub. Henry rides on the balls of his feet (which is good) so on the swingarm he will actually wear through the swingarm sticker by the end of the day from gripping the bike so hard."

"We also use custom seat covers and extra stiff foam from Seat Concepts. This works well for Henry and he really likes the grip and finish of the seats.  Henry typically prefers new seat covers quite frequently because for him they have the best grip when new.   He also prefers extra stiff seat foam."

"For the controls we run Odi podium McGrath bend bars with Odi medium compound half waffle grips.  These grips have a great durable design and give Henry the feel he is looking for.  For levers we use Arc unbreakable clutch and brake levers.  We run the composite clutch lever and metal brake lever.  Henry tends to run the levers in a more neutral position just a little bit below the bars.  This can vary from rider to rider and most are particular about the placement of the levers."

"Moving downward the handlebars are mounted to Xtrig adjustable triple clamps.  Ours are set to 22mm of offset for outdoors. These clamps compliment the bars, because the clamps have built in dampers and the bars actually have flex built into them via the crossbar.  This creates a controlled level of flex and compliance through the front end for Henry."

"As for the chassis the frame is cut where the radiators are bolted approximately 8mm to narrow the bike up as much as possible. Combined with cutting the frame and the cycra plastic the bike is about 1 1/2 - 1 3/4" narrower at the shroud location.  This is a critical fix and can greatly improve the controlled feel of the bike.  The subframe has also been lowered 10mm so the seat doesn't kick him in the butt through the whoops and rollers. This was done by Clayton at Trick Engineering."

"As we all know the front brake on a bike is critical. This is even more important for fast pros like Henry.  They require massive amounts of stopping power since the carry so much more speed than the average rider.  We use a front brake setup built by Motostuff for some much needed stopping power which includes a Honda master cylinder, Motostuff pro lite brake line, Motostuff works billet caliper, Motostuff 280mm oversized rotor, and AP racing brake pads.  All of this combined gives Henry the bite he needs when slowing down on the track.  This setup is available to anyone through Motostuff.  We always tell fans to beware though, because this setup will send you over the bars in a hurry!!! This is the best front brake setup in the business!!  Henry actually prefers the brake lever a little "soft" feeling so that he has more modulation in the brake to prevent going over the bars on accident."

"Continuing downwards the wheels feature some really cool looking red Kite hubs and oversized spokes and nipples from Nore Worx.  We wrap this with an Excel a60 rim, front and rear, along with Motostuff rear and front brake rotors.  The final drive system consists of a Mika metals sprocket set up with a 13-50 gearing and a slick RK racing chain.  Lastly Dunlop tires (usually mx3s) are fitted to the wheels to round out the package."

"For the real meat and potatoes part lets take a look at the motor.  We use a full Hinson clutch setup for durability and feel.  We also use a Carillo connecting rod for added reliability.  On top of that have the folks at JE supply us with a high compression piston to get some extra power out of the Yamaha.  Moving upwards in the engine we have a set of Pro Circuit cams to compliment the JE piston.  To most people's surprise we have no porting or polishing.  With these mods the bike would be way too hard to hang onto."

"Continuing on we have a GYTR ignition cover for durability and protection against rocks or big crashes.  A Vortex ignition and VP Pro 6 high temp fuel are used to liven up the bike.  Again, most don't believe me when I say it, but this bike has absolutely NO launch control or computers to aide/help with starts. The start at the Spring Creek National second moto was all Henry!!! Really cool huh?! We don't have a laptop to check the engine every time it comes off of the track like factory teams so we have to do the very best we can.  Donnie over at FMF helped us on staying competitive with a 4.1 complete pipe.  This is one sick exhaust and works well with the aftermarket engine components."

"Moving over the everyone's favorite part..... the graphics!  We chose a unique design that highlights one of our biggest sponsors, FXR Racing.  These graphics are done by Black Diamond MX.  We get a lot of compliments and comments on the bike at each round.  Underneath we have a very durable Cycra skidplate for protection against rocks.  Continuing on with Henry's need for extreme grip and control we use Raptor titanium footpegs.  Moving a bit forward slightly Henry likes to run the shift lever even with the top of the pegs.  This is a bit different from the way the bikes are built in the factories."

"Let's talk suspension or arguably the most important part of the bike.  The suspension that we use on the big Yamaha is the KYB air A-kit forks (upper level equipment) from Technical Touch.  We pair that with a KYB A-kit shock also from Technical Touch, but setup by Ross at Enzo racing.  Henry prefers air forks over the spring fork as this allows him to "change" the spring rate based on track conditions by raising or lowering the air pressure.  The quick adjustability usually makes things better for me in the long run."

'One unique part of Henry's bike is the chassis.  It really stands out from the other bikes on the line.  The frame, swingarm and subframe are powder coated black for a really cool and trick look.  Inside the frame we use a DT1 air filter with the Power Flow kit that has no metal screen on the air filter cage.  This gives us a better flowing engine while still maintaining the needed filtration."

"Luckily for me Henry is not very picky on anything really.  He is also consistent with his set up for the most part.  Some small things I do to make sure we are good to go on the weekends is to check that the shifter is level with the peg and that the brake pedal sits a little bit higher than peg on the right side.  Henry definitely uses the clutch when he's out there so I always check to make sure the adjuster isn't wore out or doesn't need replacing.  We want to minimize any chances of part failure during these brutally long motos. 

"Henry's an incredible rider and is great to work with. I think you could put henry on any bike and he could fly within an hour or two of riding it.  He's got a lot of natural talent and can feel right at home very quickly.  A great attribute about our dynamic is that he's not very picky so this allows us to test new things and find settings that work best.  I strive to keep this bike performing at it's best each time Henry throws his leg over and I am glad we are starting to see that hard work pay off."

For more information on Triggr Racing and Henry Miller be sure to follow them and keep an eye out for these two in the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross circuit all summer long.